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January 2008
Panavision Unveils New Tools
Panavision recently held its inaugural Panafest, an invite-only luncheon and expo for press, cinematographers and related professionals.
LEDz Mini-Par
The new LEDz Mini-Par weighs 10 ounces, works on just 1 amp of electricity and can provide a 12"-diameter beam angle, giving you a T5.6/8 at 500 ISO from 6' away — not bad for a fixture that costs less than $600.
Arri Lightweight Zoom LWZ-1
Arri and Zeiss have released the 15.5-45mm T2.6 Lightweight Zoom LWZ-1, a compact cine zoom that weighs only 4.4 pounds and boasts high optical performance.
Film and Video Accessories from Arri
Arri recently unveiled new accessories for use with video and film camera systems, including the LMB-15 matte box, Super Wide 16x9 Modules for the MB-20 matte box system, and, as part of the HD Camera Support line, a quick-release base plate and dual-system lens supports.
Cooke Red Lenses
Lens manufacturer Cooke Optics Ltd. has unveiled the Cooke Red Set for use with the Red camera system. Incorporating /i metadata capture technology that can be read directly by the /i contacts of the Red camera lens mount, the set of four Cooke S4/i lenses — each engraved with red lettering — comprises three primes (50mm, 75mm and 100mm) and a 15-40mm CXX zoom, all T2.0.
New Filter Gauge from Formatt
Formatt Filters recently announced that its entire range of standard and HD glass filters — around 600 total — will be made available in 4mm gauge.
Dfx Digital Filter Suite
Tiffen has expanded its filter line into the digital realm with the introduction of the Dfx digital filter suite software.
Manfrotto 503HDV Pro Fluid Head
Bogen Imaging, the U.S. distributor of Manfrotto products, has introduced the Manfrotto 503HDV pro fluid head.
Manfrotto Hydrostatic Video Arms
Also available from Bogen, Manfrotto has applied its hydrostatic locking technology to its line of video arms, offering the new Hydrostatic Arms in three lengths to accommodate a wide range of shooting situations.
Cinevator Reaches New Heights
Cinevation AS, manufacturer of real-time digital film recorders, digital film printers and digital intermediate tools for the post industry, has unveiled the brand-new CinevatorHD.
Boxxster from Digitalvideo Computing
Digitalvideo Computing (DVC) has introduced the Boxxster uncompressed disk recorder, which is able to record and play back all popular SD, HD and DCI formats.

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Panavision Unveils New Tools

Panavision recently held its inaugural Panafest, an invite-only luncheon and expo for press, cinematographers and related professionals. Amidst some impressive celebrity impersonators ranging from Marilyn Monroe to Chewbacca, Panavision President and CEO Bob Beitcher unveiled a variety of new hardware. The following is an overview of the afternoon’s offerings.

Beitcher introduced a series of on-board battery brackets intended to be an alternative to the more cumbersome battery belts typically used when shooting in handheld or Steadicam mode. Panavision offers two versions of the bracket, one for the Genesis and one for the Millennium and Millennium XL2 cameras. In addition to built-in ‘V’ mounts that accept IDX-type batteries, the brackets have available adapters to accept Anton-Bauer gold-mount batteries. Instead of being tethered to a heavy battery belt, the batteries now can ride on top of the camera, along the optical axis, so side-to-side balance is not affected. A fore and aft adjustment is provided for balancing with various lenses and recording media.

The film version is intended to work with 400' or 500' magazines but can also accommodate a 1,000' magazine. The Genesis version works with the new SSR-1 recorder and the SRW-1.

Next up were three new 35mm video assists, the XLV (for use with the XL2 camera), MAV (for the Millennium) and PAV2 (for the Panaflex Gold, Gold II and Platinum cameras). Each was touted for improved sensitivity; improved sharpness; easy user adjustments for focus, position, rotation and auto-gain; focus knob for no-tools adjustments; and flicker-free operation at all speeds.

All three of the new video assists use the same processor module for convenient interchangeability. Additionally, the MAV uses the same optics as the XLV, which means improved compatibility between the XL2 and Millennium cameras’ viewfinders. In turn, this allows usage of the MXLFT lightweight handheld viewfinder from the XL2 on the Millennium, making for a lighter-weight handheld mode with the larger camera.

These three video assists are all based on new sensors and digital processing, providing brighter and sharper images. Video-only ND filters allow the user to adapt the video to bright exteriors without darkening the image to the viewfinder, and because each video unit is digitally controlled, major parameters such as brightness, sharpness, color saturation and frameline/text output can be set via computer connection, enabling better consistency from camera to camera.

Moving into the larger “toys,” Beitcher unveiled an updated XL2 camera that can run at crystal-controlled speeds from 3 fps to 50 fps. The XL2 features a new preset speed position for 24 fps/172.8-degree shutter, added to the dial on the rear control panel, making it easier to shoot 24 fps in 50Hz regions. A 50 fps/180 shutter has been added to the preset dial as well.

The revamped XL2 body, weighing 11.8 pounds, also uses completely new motors, improving cold-weather performance while providing a number of mechanical and electronic tweaks for more reliable operation, including new dual-drive motors for shutter and movement, which can be easily retimed for effects. There is also a remote one-touch speed and shutter control, including in-shot variable control from an 11.2- to a 180-degree shutter.

Emphasizing that Panavision believes the future of filmmaking is both film-based and digital, Beitcher introduced the SSR-1 solid-state recorder for the Genesis digital camera (and, soon, the Sony F23). Designed as a stand-alone unit, and about half the size and weight of the SRW-1, the SSR-1 offers a low profile when mounted on the Genesis, making it well-suited to handheld and Steadicam work or tight shooting situations.

Designed to integrate into current workflows based on the SRW-1 HDCAM SR recorder, the SSR-1 has a low power consumption and records in uncompressed 1080 PsF 4:4:4 or 4:2:2, with a 21-minute capacity at 23.98 fps in 4:4:4 and a 43-minute capacity at 4:2:2. The SSR-1 can record at Genesis-selectable speeds from S1 to S30 fps.

Behaving much like a smaller version of the SRW-1 videotape recorder, the SSR-1 can connect directly to the Genesis multi-pin connector on the top or rear port for on-board, cable-free recording controlled by the camera’s record button. And, like the SRW-1, the SSR-1 can be fitted to an external adapter for recording at a distance from the camera. A built-in down-converter for NTSC or PAL output is also available, even when the unit is mounted on the Genesis, as is an HD-SDI 4:2:2 output for monitoring.

Back on the film side of things, Panavision unveiled a new compact zoom lens, the PCZ, a 19-90mm T2.8 zoom with a close focus of 2.25'. Measuring 8" long and weighing a mere 7.3 pounds, the PCZ complements existing Primo prime and zoom lenses and is suitable for use in dolly, remote head, handheld and Steadicam configurations.

Representing the latest generation of Panavision spherical-lens design, the PCZ uses aspheric elements to produce a wide range of commonly used focal lengths in a package about half the size and weight of comparable zooms. While maximizing contrast, resolution and field illumination, the PCZ minimizes breathing, veiling glare, ghosting, distortion and other aberrations and maintains constant focus and T2.8 aperture throughout the zoom range. With the same front diameter as the SLZ 17.5-75mm zoom (5.040"), the PCZ also features zero backlash mechanics along with dual-size scales and standard gear locations for focus, zoom and T-stop.

The new G-Series of anamorphic lenses rounded out the day’s highlights. Comprising six primes and two zooms, these eight lenses represent the foundation for a new range of high-performance anamorphic optics created through advanced computer-aided design and feature internal mechanical improvements over previous Panavision anamorphics.

The G-Series lenses are engineered to produce high contrast and resolution, minimal aberrations and even field illumination, as well as low veiling glare, ghosting and distortion. All of the lenses utilize Panavision’s patented “anti-mumping” technology, but unlike previous series, there is no hump for the gearset, so the lenses maintain their cylindrical profile.

The initial set of G-Series anamorphic primes comprises 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 60mm, 75mm and 100mm lenses, and more focal lengths will be added in the future. The primes are typically T2.6 with close focus under 3'. All the prime lenses have a common front diameter of 4.440" (the same as Primo lenses). Focus and T-stop scales are engraved on both sides of the lens, and focus and T-stop gears are in the standard Panavision locations. Performance and size make these prime lenses comparable to the Panavision E-Series anamorphic primes, but in a lightweight, compact format similar to the C-Series.

The new G-Series anamorphic zooms comprise a wide-angle (AWZ2) 40-80mm T2.8 and a telephoto (ATZ) 70-200mm T3.5. The AWZ2 close-focuses to 3.25', the ATZ to 5.5'.

The AWZ2 (anamorphic wide-angle zoom, dubbed the “Bailey zoom” after John Bailey, ASC, who was among the first to ask for it) was actually introduced last year and was the first modern zoom lens to use anamorphic elements at the front of the lens. The new Panavision ATZ (anamorphic telephoto zoom) is the second modern zoom to implement the front anamorphic design, which substantially reduces stop loss and produces superior image quality with minimal aberrations and improved field illumination. Both zooms have a constant aperture at all zoom positions.

Because of their high-performance imaging, these zooms are not restricted to use as variable primes, but are fully usable as in-shot zooms. They feature exceptional sharpness and contrast with minimal breathing, aberrations, veiling glare and distortion. Both zooms offer even illumination across the entire image as well as superior mechanics for precise, repeatable focus with zero backlash, and their symmetrical housings prevent mechanical interference with camera viewing systems.

The G-Series primes are typically 4.5 pounds and about 6" long, the ATZ is 12.75 pounds and 15" long, and the AWZ2 is 10.4 pounds and 10.5" long.

— Jay Holben
contact info:  
www.panavision.com
LEDz Mini-Par

The new LEDz Mini-Par weighs 10 ounces, works on just 1 amp of electricity and can provide a 12"-diameter beam angle, giving you a T5.6/8 at 500 ISO from 6' away — not bad for a fixture that costs less than $600.

Measuring 5" high by 2" wide with a 21⁄4" -diameter lens, the fixture contains three ultra-bright light emitting diodes (LEDs) that put out a lot of punch. I was astounded at how bright the little LEDs were; it’s easier for me to look down the throat of a 1.2K HMI Par than to look directly at the bare LEDs on the Mini-Par!

The fixture has three interchangeable lenses, giving the user the options of spot (8 degree), medium (25 degree) and wide (40 degree). The lenses are made of plastic and each features a built-in reflector and lens configuration for each of the three LEDs. Three long, plastic rods on the lens attachments slide into three holes in the face of the fixture, and a metal retention ring screws into place to secure the lens. The anodized-aluminum fixture is very sturdy, but the lenses seem rather fragile, and I can easily imagine one of the plastic rods being snapped off at the slightest infraction in handling. The spot lens was also quite prone to scratches, too many of which would certainly compromise the light quality. Aside from the lenses, the fixture is extremely robust and will easily stand up to the rigors of production. I was pleasantly surprised to find that even the retention ring, which I fumbled a couple of times, won’t deform or dent when you drop it.

Although the LEDz is a multi-bulb fixture, the multiple shadows aren’t as severe as I expected them to be. With the wide lens, they’re extremely subtle. It’s still a small source, one I would diffuse in most situations. However, I don’t see an easy way to do that. There are no barn doors, no clips, no sockets or hinges — nothing readily accessible to attach any of the existing soft boxes to the round lens — and when I checked the Web site, I saw no accessories that easily accommodate softboxes or diffusion. On the same note, there is no easy method for attaching color correction unless you’re cutting gel into a circle to fit inside the retaining ring. Additionally, the head heats up much more than I expected, and though it never got too hot for bare fingers, it would certainly melt any tape put on it. LEDz would do well to create a softbox attachment or a retention ring that will accept the softboxes already widely available.

None of the lenses presents color-fringing problems, and they all change over very quickly; it took less than 30 seconds to remove the retaining ring and slip in the next lens.
The fixture comes with an integrated baby-spud (5⁄8") receptacle, and the user can also purchase a camera shoe connector. The head rotates vertically on the body, tilting about 190 degrees from front to back, and locks positively in place.

At 6' with the spot lens, I measured a circular beam angle (center point to 50 percent drop-off) with a 12"-diameter and a field angle (down to 75 percent drop-off) of 16". The medium lens at the same distance yielded a 28" beam angle with a 38" field angle, and, finally, the wide lens gave me a 50" beam angle and an 80" field angle.

The Mini-Par has a built-in dimmer knob that dims the fixture down to an impressive 1 percent with no change in color temperature. The knob is rather odd in that it takes three full rotations to cover the entire dimming range. This allows for very fine control of the output, but there’s no way to measure or calibrate the dimming on the unit itself. In addition, on the fixture I worked with, the dimming knob was very loose and very easily bumped. It would be nice to have a tighter knob or one with positive “clicks” built in to prevent accidental changes in intensity.

At first, I struggled to come up with applications for this fixture; it doesn’t have the output of, say, a 200-watt Joker or the 200-watt Bron Kobold (AC Oct. ’07), so it doesn’t really compete in the small HMI category. It can certainly fit on-camera for ENG shooting or live events, or even as an Obie light, but it seems a little punchy and harsh for most of those situations without some additional diffusion. It wasn’t until I started to consider my love for Dedolights that I really saw the potential in the LEDz.

With their compact size, flexibility and punch, Dedolights integrate well with my working style. Although the LEDz wouldn’t replace the Dedo, in my opinion, it would certainly work as an alternative in many situations where the Dedo shines: fitting into compact spaces and providing detail lighting. The color and texture from the Mini-Par also immediately brought to mind a nice little moonlight edge that can be easily hidden in the architecture. Once I saw the fixture this way, I started imagining a world of possibilities.

I also had an opportunity to work with a prototype of LEDz’s new Brute 9. Although I’m hesitant to be too critical of a prototype, I will pass along some preliminary thoughts. Bear in mind that many things can change between the prototype stage and the production model.

The fixture is designed like a pocket-sized Maxi Brute with nine separate LED lamps arranged in three rows of three. It’s heavy for a small fixture, weighing 2.1 pounds, and measures 6.5" high by 5.5" wide by 2.5" thick.

The fixture is designed in such a way that it can be mounted side-by-side in a two-fixture configuration or side-by-side and top-to-bottom in a quad-fixture configuration, which would certainly give this little unit an impressive punch. My photometrics for the Brute 9 were as follows:

2' – 440 fc
4' – 120 fc
6' – 52 fc
8' – 39 fc
10' – 28 fc
12' – 20 fc
14' – 12 fc

At a distance of 5', the individual LEDs blended nicely into a smooth source. At 2', I started to see hot spots and holes in the light output. There are definitely issues with multiple shadows, even at 6' and 8' away.

The Brute 9 puts out a rectangular light source; at 6', it was about a 60"x28" beam angle. I was disappointed that there was no easy way to mount the fixture horizontally; I had to put it sideways on a C-stand arm to create a horizontal beam.

It has a built-in gel holder, which is really just two thin slots above and below the lights into which a thin sandwich frame fits. It’s delicate, and I can see most users forgoing it in the same way we usually forgo gel holders with traditional Fresnel fixtures.

The fixture got much hotter than I expected, almost too hot to touch with my bare hands after a 30-minute burn time.

Both fixtures are marketed as environmentally friendly. They consume very little electricity, have lamp hours exceeding 60,000 (which minimizes waste) and are not filled with harmful chemicals.

— Jay Holben

contact info:

LEDz (818) 565-0510.

 
www.led-z.com
Arri Lightweight Zoom LWZ-1

Arri and Zeiss have released the 15.5-45mm T2.6 Lightweight Zoom LWZ-1, a compact cine zoom that weighs only 4.4 pounds and boasts high optical performance.

Able to close focus to 18" from the film plane, the LWZ-1 forms a high-contrast and high-resolution image with minimal breathing and almost no chromatic aberration or geometric distortion over the entire zoom range and at all focus settings. Likewise, it covers the whole Super 35 frame at all focal lengths.
To create the LWZ-1, Arri and Zeiss employed radically shaped spherical glass surfaces for the first time in a cine lens. These lens surfaces feature a very strong curvature — some are almost hemispherical — making them difficult to grind and polish and demanding precise attention during coating. The result is incomparable optical performance at a substantially reduced weight.

Additionally, the LWZ-1 incorporates aspherical lens elements and exotic glass materials that further help minimize the weight and reduce spherical aberration and geometric distortions. Using aspherical glass surfaces in a lens design requires ultra-high precision and a complex holographic measuring process, which was developed specifically for the Master Primes and now benefits all new Arri/Zeiss lens designs.

Creating a pleasing, gentle color balance, the new T* XP multi-layer anti-reflection coating reduces flare and internal reflections. Compared to conventional coatings, it has a better transmission and a more uniform performance from optical center all the way to the edges, resulting in higher contrast and deeper, richer blacks. The lens’ internal construction in combination with the T* XP coating ensures that it can easily handle tricky lighting situations, from strong backlight to sunsets and car headlamps. Careful optical design ensures that the Lightweight Zoom stays a true T2.6 throughout the complete zoom range, and the round iris opening leads to organic-looking, pleasing out-of-focus highlights.

The Lightweight Zoom has been Super Color Matched, ensuring that its optical and color characteristics have been optimized to match the Master Primes, Ultra Primes, Variable Primes, and Ultra 16 lenses. The design of focus, zoom and iris scales has been matched to the other Arri/Zeiss lenses, and the front diameter of 114mm is the same as that of the Master Primes. Precision ball bearings ensure easy focusing and zooming at all temperature and humidity conditions, and chamfered precision gears mesh smoothly with the gears on follow focus units and lens motors. Lastly, the backbone of the lens is a lightweight yet sturdy inner skeleton that boasts special weight-reducing construction.

contact info:  
www.arri.com
Film and Video Accessories from Arri

Arri recently unveiled new accessories for use with video and film camera systems, including the LMB-15 matte box, Super Wide 16x9 Modules for the MB-20 matte box system, and, as part of the HD Camera Support line, a quick-release base plate and dual-system lens supports.

Building on the success of the LMB-5 matte box, the LMB-15 is similarly designed around horizontal use of standard 4"x5.65" filters, and the new matte box is compatible with LMB-5 filter trays, adapter backs and light shields. The LMB-15 also features a new clamping back that allows the use of clamp-on adapter rings from the Arri MB-20 system (this clamping back is also compatible with the LMB-5).

The MB-20 System II adds Super Wide 16x9 Modules, allowing full coverage in 16x9 format for extreme HD wide angles — such as the 3.9mm DigiWide — while retaining sunshade depth for flare protection superior to customary extreme wide-angle matte boxes. These new modules utilize the swing-away bracket and support rod consoles common to all MB-20 matte boxes as well as the light shields from the MB-20 System II.

Arri’s HD Camera Support line now offers a new quick-release base plate and dual-system lens supports for HD lenses. The quick-release base plate provides flexibility when switching from tripod to handheld, while retaining a rock-solid and secure attachment mechanism. A dedicated bridge plate allows the use of accessories conforming to Arri studio rod standards with a unique centering adjustment system to compensate for variations in camera base to optical axis measurements.

Arri’s new dual-system lens supports utilize tried and tested snap-on rod systems from the FF-5 follow focus for unprecedented speed and ease of use. The new follow focus FF5-HD is specifically designed for the gear ratio of HD lenses, achieving an extremely precise focus pull. The LWS support can be used directly with the adapter bridges from the FF-5 for optimal utilization and inventory flexibility. Adapter rings are available for both cine-style and ENG/EFP-style lenses.

contact info:  
www.arri.com
Cooke Red Lenses

Lens manufacturer Cooke Optics Ltd. has unveiled the Cooke Red Set for use with the Red camera system. Incorporating /i metadata capture technology that can be read directly by the /i contacts of the Red camera lens mount, the set of four Cooke S4/i lenses — each engraved with red lettering — comprises three primes (50mm, 75mm and 100mm) and a 15-40mm CXX zoom, all T2.0.

Cooke’s /i “Intelligent” Technology enables film and digital cameras to automatically record key lens and camera data for every film frame. In turn, this information can be provided digitally to post teams, streamlining the workflow, cutting costs and eliminating guesswork.

This set of four standard lenses, which can be used with any PL-mount camera system, comes with a rigid carrying case and protective glass for the CXX zoom lens. Because the Red camera features built-in support for Cooke’s /i Technology, no additional equipment is needed.

contact info:  
www.cookeoptics.com
New Filter Gauge from Formatt

Formatt Filters recently announced that its entire range of standard and HD glass filters — around 600 total — will be made available in 4mm gauge.

The company has traditionally manufactured its filters to a thickness of 3mm, and Formatt Filters’ managing director David Stamp says this change is a direct response to industry demand. “The feedback we have received from major rental companies, particularly in the U.S., is that their cinematographer customers want Formatt quality, but the filters should look and feel the same as others.”

While Formatt’s 3mm filters come with a frame, the new 4mm filters will be edged with a hard protective resin to aid longevity of use. Additionally, thanks to the company’s newly introduced water-jet cutting and laser-marking technology, filters can be made to order and shipped within two weeks.

contact info:

Formatt Filters +44 1685 870 979.

 
www.formatt.co.uk
Dfx Digital Filter Suite

Tiffen has expanded its filter line into the digital realm with the introduction of the Dfx digital filter suite software. Simulating the extensive range of Tiffen’s optical filters as well as Kodak Wratten filters, the new software is available as a robust stand-alone application and as an array of plug-in suites for those preferring to work within already installed video-post applications such as Apple Final Cut Pro, Adobe After Effects and Avid Editing Systems, or still-image applications such as Adobe Photoshop.

Every Dfx digital filter suite offers precision adjustments over its range of effects. A complete edition includes the most comprehensive array today, emulating more than 1,000 traditional workhorse and special-effects optical glass filters and gels. Additionally, both the plug-in and stand-alone editions are compatible with Windows XP, Vista and Macintosh OS X v10.4.

For users who choose the Dfx plug-in, two options are available. A Select Edition features a range of popular filter effects, while the Complete Edition provides the entire range of over 1,000 effects. Regardless of the version used, Tiffen expects the Dfx filter suite to become an invaluable tool for cinematographers as they communicate their intended look with others.

The Tiffen Dfx digital filter suite Complete Stand-alone Boxed Edition retails for $199.95.

contact info:  
www.tiffen.com
Manfrotto 503HDV Pro Fluid Head

Bogen Imaging, the U.S. distributor of Manfrotto products, has introduced the Manfrotto 503HDV pro fluid head. Based on Manfrotto’s earlier 503 fluid head, this new version is designed specifically for use with HDV camcorders and boasts several new features, including Manfrotto’s new triple-spring adjustable counterbalance system.

Combining state-of-the-art fea-tures with an easy to use design, the 503HDV touts large ergonomic locks and knobs for a more solid grip and better control. An adjustable switch controls the counterbalance settings, allowing the user to adjust the triple-spring system to accommodate various payloads for different filming needs. The counterbalance system can be adjusted to four positions ensuring both smoother tilt movements and greater equipment safety, and for enhanced ease of use, all of the controls are located on the left side of the head.

The 503HDV also features an illuminated LED bubble level, making it easy for operators to level the camera in low-light conditions. Furthermore, the pan handle rosette on the 503HDV is fully replaceable, allowing users to change out a worn rosette without having to send the head away for repair.

contact info:  
www.bogenimaging.us
www.manfrotto.com
Manfrotto Hydrostatic Video Arms

Also available from Bogen, Manfrotto has applied its hydrostatic locking technology to its line of video arms, offering the new Hydrostatic Arms in three lengths to accommodate a wide range of shooting situations.

These new lightweight arms feature a revolutionary locking system that produces a firm lock with minimal effort. Incorporating a technically advanced ball-locking mechanism, the hydrostatic action is based on the hydraulic principle that a force applied to one point is transmitted to another point. Gently turning the knob of the hydrostatic system compresses the oil in the filled chamber, and the liquid then blocks the movement of the ball. Because the force exerted by the liquid is more constant and evenly distributed than that of standard mechanisms, the locking power is dramatically improved over other technologies. With just a slight turn of the wrist, the arm securely locks in the desired position to firmly hold any camera, monitor, or accessory.

For shorter-length applications, Manfrotto provides the 814 arm, which measures 5.1" and has a maximum load of 7.7 pounds. The pivoting pin of the 814 is threaded with 1⁄4"-20 and 3⁄8" studs so it can be attached to the top of a video camera to support a small monitor or other video accessories. The 819 arm is ideal for attaching video monitors to a camera or for use as a flag support. Measuring 7" in length, the 819 can support payloads up to 4.85 pounds, and, like the 814, it features pivoting pins with ¼"-20 and 3⁄8" threads. The largest of the Hydrostatic Arms, the 823 can support up to 8.8 pounds and spans 9.25". The 823 is the first video arm that features 5⁄8" and 1⁄4" pins to support larger and heavier items, and for added versatility, one of the two pins is hex shaped to fit perfectly with Manfrotto’s Superclamp, allowing the 823 to position lighting fixtures or cameras virtually anywhere.

contact info:  
www.bogenimaging.us
www.manfrotto.com
Cinevator Reaches New Heights

Cinevation AS, manufacturer of real-time digital film recorders, digital film printers and digital intermediate tools for the post industry, has unveiled the brand-new CinevatorHD. Joining the renowned Cinevator range of real-time film recorders and printers, the CinevatorHD boasts state-of-the-art design innovations and new manufacturing processes, allowing even greater freedom of customization to the existing CinevatorOne and CinevatorFive models. The new CinevatorHD targets the rapidly growing HD video and independent film market, meeting the demand for low-cost film transfers.

Based on DLP technology from Texas Instruments, the CinevatorHD film recorder allows recording at 24 fps and 25 fps in native HD resolution onto intermediate negative film stocks. Additionally, it can be customized to work as a digital film printer or strictly as an intermediate negative film recorder.

“We learned from our customers that there is a rapidly increasing demand for HD-to-film transfer services, especially for small-budget productions,” says Rune Bjerkestrand, managing director and founder of Cinevation. “The CinevatorHD is our response to this demand, enabling post houses and film laboratories to offer affordable services and faster turnaround times than ever before.”

contact info:

Cinevation AS +47 90533432

 
office@cinevation.net
www.cinevation.net
Boxxster from Digitalvideo Computing

Digitalvideo Computing (DVC) has introduced the Boxxster uncompressed disk recorder, which is able to record and play back all popular SD, HD and DCI formats.

Utilizing the latest 2.5" hard disk technology, Boxxster maintains a compact design, low noise level and low power consumption. And, like other ClipRecorders from DVC, Boxxster is based on the QuickClip software platform, guaranteeing 100 percent VTR emulation, which means that it can be controlled like a professional video recorder by RS422 and Sony 9-pin protocols. Additionally, Boxxster supports the clip-based Louth VDCP and Odetics protocols, and the recorder can be controlled frame-accurately by a number of current animation systems.

Combining playlist, loop mode, clip management, batch recording and other important functions, Boxxster can be operated over IP by remote control via a Java or HTTP user interface, and with the included SyncControl software, several Boxxsters can be synchronized for multi-channel record and playback.

Boxxster stores image data in regular file formats on a standard NTFS disk array, with direct access to image data available via Gigabit Ethernet. The recorder’s File Import Manager allows all popular compressed and uncompressed video and audio file formats to be imported with ease. Furthermore, in addition to SD/HD-SDI I/O, Boxxter possesses analogue video and audio interfaces, making it a low-cost replacement for HD video recorders and a universal replay machine for HD and 2K presentations. The recorder can even be utilized for 1080i or 720p HD broadcast applications thanks to its simple connection to broadcast automation systems.

Boxxster can be delivered with 480 GB, 720 GB or 1200 GB of storage, equating to approximately 72, 108 and 180 minutes of uncompressed 1080i HD material, respectively.

contact info:  
www.digitalvideo.de