American Cinematographer Magazine: September 2006 - New Products

The American Society of Cinematographers

Loyalty • Progress • Artistry

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September 2006
Contour Reality Capture
The Contour Reality Capture System, introduced at this year’s Siggraph convention, may not only help bridge the traditional and virtual filmmaking worlds, but also breathe genuine life into “synthespian” performers. The system, a proprietary apparatus developed and now offered by the San Francisco mo-cap studio Mova, employs two synchronized camera systems to simultaneously capture 3-D geometric and full-color visual information of the subject.
Kelly HiDef Depth-of-Field Calculator
The Guild of British Camera Technicians‘ HiDef Depth-of-Field Calculator (produced in association with Panavision Europe) is specifically designed for the new dedicated camera lenses used for shooting high-definition video for big-screen cinema.
Bella Corporations Catapult Online
Bella Corporation, a company focused on designing and producing innovative products for the consumer and broadcast video markets, introduced the Catapult at NAB 2006. Allowing capture of video footage from DV or HDV video cameras directly to iPods or almost any USB drive, the Catapult eliminates the time consuming task of digitizing video footage.
Da Vinci Systems Resolve V3.2 Online
Da Vinci Systems has announced the release of Resolve V3.2, the latest version of its Resolve nonlinear color-enhancement system.
Da Vinci Systems Splice Online
Following on the heels of its release of Resolve V3.2, da Vinci Systems has unveiled Splice, a new product that creates a “virtual telecine” for the da Vinci 2K Plus.
Multibridge Extreme Online
Blackmagic Design has introduced to the postproduction world the Multibridge Extreme bi-directional converter featuring built-in PCI Express.
Panther Foxy Advanced Crane System and New HQ Online
Panther Dollies and Cranes has announced the opening of its North American headquarters at 801 S. Main St, Burbank, CA 91506. The announcement coincided with NAB 2006 and the introduction of the new Panther Foxy Advanced Crane System.
Celcos Fury 4K, Firestorm 2X and Hollywood HQ Online
Celco, a leader in digital film-recording systems, has unleashed the Fury 4K digital film recorder. Celco’s fastest, highest-resolution recorder to date, the Fury 4K features a dramatic improvement in speed for full range, 10-bit log, 4K imagery onto Kodak 2242 color intermediate negative stock.
BaseMatte from Reflecmedia Online
Introduced at NAB 2006 and planned for release later this year, UK-based chroma key specialist Reflecmedia has unveiled BaseMatte (still a working title), the newest product in its Chromatte line.
PFClean V2.0, PFTrack V3.0 from the Pixel Farm Online
The Pixel Farm, a company focused on innovation in the field of high-end digital postproduction, utilized NAB 2006 to unveil a number of new products and services.
Baselight HD, Northlight 2, and Truelight Colourist from FilmLight Online
FilmLight, a leading provider of digital filmmaking technology, has unveiled the Baselight HD grading system, the Northlight 2 film scanner, and the Truelight Colourist Package.
Bluefish444 Catalyst Online
Bluefish444 has unleashed the Catalyst 2K DSP hardware processing 16-bit RGB video card into the waters of digital postproduction.
PT20 & PT24 Pan & Tilt Systems; 300 and 4000 Series Jib Arms from the Camera Turret Company Online
The Camera Turret Company, a division of Camera Turret Technologies Inc, offers pan-and-tilt systems as well as jib arms to the film and video industries.
FrontNiche HD-SDI TFT LCD Monitors Online
FrontNiche offers a full line of HD-SDI TFT LCD screens, ranging from 6.4” to 57” and covering all the bases in between.
Elipz from Anton Bauer Online
Targeting the increasingly popular DV and HDV prosumer camera systems, Anton Bauer has introduced the Elipz generation of battery, light and grip products created specifically to enhance runtime, performance and ergonomics.
Porta-Jibs Porta-Slide and Free-Styler Jr. Online
Porta-Jib, the company that has brought us FlexTrak, Spider Dollies and a range of Jib Arms, has added the Porta-Slide and Free-Styler Jr. to its lineup.
Transvideo StarliteColor LCD Monitor Online
The good people at Transvideo have unveiled the new 4" StarliteColor LCD monitor. Offering the compactness of a flip-out screen with the quality of a professional viewfinder, the StarliteColor is switchable between color, green screen and black-and-white.
Fraunhofer Megacine Online
Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS has developed a new portable field recorder for digital cinema, high definition and standard definition.
Zylights Z50 LED Online
Zylight has announced the Z50 Intelligent LED light, a fixture that the company is calling the first in a line of next-generation LED lighting instruments.
Mesh from Pandora Online
Pandora International has introduced Mesh freeform color-correction software and a Data File workflow that promises true collaborative color correction.
Phantom Digital Widescreen Cinema Online
Vision Research has announced its line of Phantom Digital Widescreen Cinema cameras, which is launching with the Phantom HD and the Phantom 65.
Imagica Imager HSR Online
Imagica Corp, one of the largest postproduction companies in Japan and a leading supplier of digital-imaging products for digital-intermediate- and digital-cinema applications, recently announced a number of new products.
Imagica Imager XE Advanced Plus and 35mm Wetgate Online
A 4K scanner and a 35mm wetgate available from Imagica.
Imagicas Primatte Online
Last but not least in the new lineup from Imagica is a new version of the Primatte chroma key technology.
Autodesk Toxic 2007; Discreet Inferno on Linux Online
At NAB 2006, Autodesk announced two new software packages for the postproduction community, Autodesk Toxik 2007 and Discreet Inferno for the Linux operating system.
Doremi Nugget HD Video Player Online
Building on its product line, Doremi labs has added new features and enhancements for its Nugget HD Video Player and new remote-control software for its HD Video Test Generator and Video Converters.
Formatt HD Filters Online
Formatt Filters has launched a new range of glass filters designed specifically for high-definition picture acquisition.
Miller Sprinter II Online
Miller Camera Support has introduced the Sprinter II tripod.
HD Mini Probe, Birds Eye, and Z Shuttle from Innovision Online
Innovision Optics has introduced the HD Mini Probe lens system, the Bird’s Eye camera support system and the Z Shuttle tracking system.
Canon HDgc, eHDxs, and IFpro Lenses Online
Canon let loose at NAB 2006, unveiling the new HDgc family of lenses, the XL H1 HD camcorder, and several additional new products.
Canon XL H1, Canobeam DT-100 and Realis Online
Canon has introduced its first HD camcorder, the XL H1. With three 1/3-inch native 16x9 1440x1080 CCDs, the XL H1 captures images at 1080i resolution and features selectable frame rates of 60i, 30 Frame and 24 Frame.
syncVUE Online
Intelligent Gadgets has introduced the syncVUE media synchronizer that plugs into Skype VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) conferencing software.
Kino Flo VistaBeam and BarFly Online
Kino Flo, a leading maker of professional fluorescent lighting systems for feature film, television and commercial production, TV broadcast and digital video, rolled out an array of new products at NAB 2006, including the VistaBeam, the BarFly, the ParaZip, the ParaBeam and the Koloris High-Beam LED.
Kino Flo ParaZip Online
Expanding its line of high-end professional studio luminaries, Kino Flo has introduced two new soft lights, the ParaZip 400 and the ParaZip 200 DMX variable control fixtures. Displaying a wide, soft beam of incandescent- or daylight-quality light (CRI 95), the ParaZips can be controlled without dramatic shifts in Kelvin temperature.
Kino Flo Koloris Online
Previously only available for lease, Kino Flo has begun selling its popular line of LED color changing Kino Koloris DMX systems. Koloris lights, with their cool operating temperature, can be handheld and moved in close to other set pieces or live subjects without fear of burning, while the units’ 16.7 million colors provide a wide spectrum of creative possibilities to cinematographers and other lighting professionals. Up to 512 fixtures can be chased or dimmed using a DMX theatrical control board.
Kino Flo ParaBeam with Select Switching Online
Improving on the already well-established ParaBeam 400, Kino Flo has introduced a redesigned model with a new “Select” switching feature that enhances the variable light control of the beam of soft light. These new “Select” fixtures can be dimmed remotely via DMX or manually at the fixture, and also two tubes at a time can be switched on or off via the “Select” feature. According to company president Frieder Hochheim, “The new switch allows you to operate down at a full f-stop less light output with ‘no’ shift in color.”
Angenieux HD-E Lenses Online
Thales Angenieux showcased its extensive lineup of HD broadcast and video production lenses at this year’s NAB conference, in addition to introducing a new lens for the Super 35 format.
Thales Angenieux and Vision III Online
Thales Angenieux has teamed with Vision III Imaging to incorporate Vision III’s new v3 AX2 Parallax Scanning Adapter into the Angenieux 26 x 7.8 AIF HD ENG/EFP Telephoto Zoom.
Angenieux Digital 40x15 AIF HD Lens and Optimo 28-76mm Lens Online
Thales Angenieux has showed the Digital 40x15 AIF HD lens, a 2/3” (16x9 aspect ratio) lens that touts a focal length of 15-600mm and an f/2.7-f/5.4 lens speed.

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Contour Reality Capture

Computer-animated feature films involve the cinematography disciplines of composition, lighting and angles, and now even depth of field is being used to great effect. However, with rare exceptions, virtual cinematography is a specialty performed by those already working in that sphere, and not one where traditional directors of photography have had much opportunity to bring their talents into play. Unfortunately, asking a cinematographer to stay on as a paid post collaborator on visual-effects-heavy films is an infrequent request at best.

A keen eye for visual aesthetics and storytelling can make the most of the real and virtual filmmaking worlds, but the divide between them is crossed by only the flimsiest of technological and methodological bridges. One is marker-based motion capture, which records the movement of a human subject as a series of dots. Originally developed for applications such as sports medicine, mo-cap precisely tracks human skeletal motion by forming a 3-D stick figure of lines connected between the dots. But any onscreen character must be far more than a moving stick figure, so although mo-cap requires actors and a sense of space and timing, the collection of mo-cap data alone is not considered cinematography; instead, it is used as a starting point. But the keyframe-animation process required to flesh that stick figure out into a realistic character is expensive and time consuming. And in the case of creating CG humans, it is a technique that many believe has not realized its full potential. (Film critics often deride the resultant avatars as “lifeless” and “zombie-like.”)

However, the Contour Reality Capture System, which was introduced at this year’s Siggraph convention, may not only help bridge the traditional and virtual filmmaking worlds, but also breathe genuine life into “synthespian” performers. The system, a proprietary apparatus developed and now offered by the San Francisco mo-cap studio Mova, employs two synchronized camera systems to simultaneously capture 3-D geometric and full-color visual information of the subject. These two sets of data are later combined to result in a high-definition, volumetric, digital representation of the action that can be later imported, modified, manipulated or retargeted to a CG character using off-the-shelf animation software.

“Production tools exist today that give a director complete photorealistic control of every object within the 3-D volume of a scene, including camera position, composition, lighting, characters and props,” says Steve Perlman, founder and CEO of the Palo Alto-based Rearden Companies, which owns and operates Mova. “But while we have powerful 3-D ‘editing’ tools, what we lack is a practical 3-D ‘camera’ that can shoot a live scene volumetrically with production-level quality. That’s where Contour Reality Capture fits in. It’s a volumetric cinematography system that captures all of the visible surfaces of a scene in 3-D.”

Mova was founded in 2004 by Rearden to provide 3-D mo-cap services using its Vicon MX-40 marker-based system, and the company’s credits include the video games The Godfather, From Russia With Love and Eragon. Mova’s sister company, Ice Blink Studios, which Perlman co-founded with Doug Chiang (production designer on The Polar Express), also is closely tied to mo-cap production, having provided visual effects and art direction for Sony Pictures’ Monster House and Warner Bros.’ upcoming Beowulf.

The chief architect behind Contour, Perlman is the holder of more than 60 patents pertaining to multimedia and communications technologies. He first attracted notice as a key researcher at Apple Computer, where he led multimedia initiatives, including the development of QuickTime, in the late 1980s. He is perhaps best known for founding WebTV Networks, which was acquired by Microsoft in 1997 and has since evolved into Microsoft’s IPTV technology.

What exactly is “volumetric cinematography?” Perlman explains, “We all got a sneak preview of it in The Matrix, when Trinity [played by Carrie-Ann Moss] froze in mid-jump and the camera view spun around her. Despite having a large ring of cameras surrounding Moss, the camera motion was limited to a single path while the entire scene was frozen. Contour allows for the same level of realism achieved in that shot, but with the entire scene in motion, with complete flexibility of camera position, and with full control over lighting and compositing. And if the actress doesn’t quite achieve the desired pose in her jump, you can use Contour to reposition her limbs in 3-D during post.”

Traditionally, human skeletal dynamics have been recorded and represented in the form of mo-cap data, which is later combined with digital skin, hair and clothing. Although this process is well suited for capturing skeletal motion for CG characters, it captures only the barest clues of the motion of deformable surfaces, such as a human face, where we typically see the finer points of an actor’s performance. Using conventional mo-cap to record the subtleties of a smile or furrowed brow is akin to the actor performing while wrapped in a head-to-toe latex suit, with their expressive eyes, fine facial characteristics and nuanced surface textures largely erased.

Conversely, Contour instantaneously records an entire human performance — simultaneously capturing skeletal movement as well as high-definition surface physical characteristics in terms of 3-D surface geometry, color and lighting — and literally “imports” this performance into the digital realm, all in a single real-time pass.

Contour records the image with high-resolution digital cameras, and the subject may be lit for any desired effect — for instance, to match a previously determined background or setting. The cameras can be run from a standard 24 fps up to 120 fps, allowing for the capture of fast action or the creation of slow-motion effects. The geometric information is recorded by an array of grayscale digital cameras — no less than two and as many as hundreds — with each photographing the performers from a slightly different angle. The visual information is recorded by a smaller array of color digital cameras — no less than one and as many as dozens — also photographing the performers from a variety of angles.

Contour is used on a light-tight soundstage lit by custom stroboscopic fluorescent lamps that illuminate the subject with white visible lights and black lights that are synced with both camera systems. Typically strobing at 90 times per second, the flashing effect is invisible to the human eye, which perceives the scene as normally lit. The visual-camera shutters open each 1/180th of a second and capture information while the fluorescent lights flash on (these are the “lit frames”). The geometry-camera shutters open each 1/180th of a second while the fluorescent lights flash off and the soundstage is in pitch darkness (the “dark frames”). And what these geometry cameras see in pitch darkness is the most interesting part of the Contour system.

A special, FDA-approved, hypoallergenic phosphorescent makeup (similar to the glow-in-the-dark makeup sold in Halloween stores) is applied in random patterns onto everything in the scene that is to be captured, including an actor’s lips and nostrils and right up to the edge of the eyes. Charged during each “lit” frame, the phosphor emits a random-pattern afterglow during the “dark” frames. These patterns are captured by each geometry camera from a different angle and then fed into a small array of computers. The computers correlate the random patterns seen by the cameras from different angles and triangulate between the cameras, producing a 3-D model of every surface visible in the scene during that frame. Anything that is not covered by the phosphorescent coating is not captured.

Using 1.3-megapixel cameras, Contour can reconstruct the 3-D surface of a human face with better than submillimeter precision, resulting in a high-resolution 3-D mesh in excess of 100,000 polygons. This is more than enough resolution to pick up the shape and motion of wrinkles and nostril flares. In comparison, the faces in the mo-cap feature Beowulf were captured with fewer than 200 polygons using a marker-based system, and it was then up to a post team to synthetically create all the details in the faces.

Contour’s resolution is so far in excess of what is needed to achieve photo-realistic results that in many applications, lower-resolution meshes (e.g., 1,000-2,000 polygons) are preferable. To this end, Contour offers a feature that allows users to retrospectively select only the points on the face where polygon vertices are required for their specific application, whether it be for high-resolution feature-film use or a video-game character. The system will then produce a lower-resolution mesh that precisely tracks these vertices through the performance from frame to frame. This also allows a single captured performance to be stored as a permanent asset that can be repurposed any number of times, saving both talent and production expenses.

The phosphorescent makeup is mostly invisible under normal lighting conditions, so by combining the phosphor with appropriate base makeup, filmmakers can achieve almost natural skin tones. The performer’s eyes and teeth — not covered by the makeup — can be tracked optically.

After a Contour mo-cap shoot, the surface geometry and the visual image are “reconstructed” overnight (each frame currently takes less than 60 seconds to compute), resulting in a high-res, full-motion, naturalistic 3-D representation of the subject, which can then be easily manipulated with such animation programs as Autodesk’s Maya, 3ds Max and MotionBuilder, or Avid Softimage’s XSI and Face Robot. “We’ve designed Contour to work with as many tools as possible,” notes Perlman. “In fact, there’s a $250 piece of software called Poser that is used to pose 3-D characters, and we’ve been dropping data right out of Contour and into Poser without a hitch.”

During the four-year development of Contour, the use of phosphorescent makeup arose as a novel solution to a distinct dilemma. “We knew we had to have something that could take a relatively smooth surface and give us a texture that we could grab hold of and track,” says Perlman. “The hard thing is that we’re often dealing with actresses who invest a lot of time and energy into making their skin perfectly smooth. If it’s perfectly smooth, then there’s no way to determine the shape of the face. So we tried several different things.

“We first tried putting black paint on the face and capturing the reflection of light on the surface. But we learned that when you’re dealing with reflected light, each camera is going to see the reflection differently, depending on its point of view of the surface. That’s why marker-based capture uses retroflective markers — they reflect back to the point of the light source. So as the character moves, you see a nice bright spot on the camera because the lights are around the camera lenses. If you use reflection as opposed to retroflection, you get all screwed up, because as the character moves, any highlights at the point of reflection move, making it look like the face is moving around even if it isn’t. So we couldn’t get reliable results. One solution was to use extremely flat lighting, where you put the subject in a lock-down situation and use reflector boards all around to eliminate highlights. You can get good capture results by doing that, but it’s just not practical when you have actors walking around and you need dramatic lighting. They may sweat and have shiny spots on their faces and so forth.”

Perlman and his team then considered using retroreflective paint, “which is used for things like highway-safety signs. But it’s not safe to apply that stuff to human skin, and also, it doesn’t deform. Retroreflective paint has tiny glass beads in it that reflect light back to the source. First of all, this would be dangerous to ingest or get in your eye, and second, the paints are really rigid once they dry because of the glass beads. We needed something that would stretch and move with the skin. We also tried ultraviolet paints to see if we could get a good capture. It would work in controlled situations, but it wouldn’t work easily and efficiently in a typical production situation.

“By that point, we were running Mova, and we were extremely sensitive to the costs and challenges associated with production. So we started looking at phosphorescent pigments and the notion of flashing the lights on and off. This was based on knowledge I’d gained when I designed large-screen monitors for Apple and researched the human visual system’s threshold for flicker perception. You’re much more sensitive to flicker perception in your peripheral vision than in your foveal [center-view] vision. Large monitors have more of their area in your peripheral vision, so running large monitors at 60Hz, which is where Apple was running their small monitors, would create an annoying flicker in the corner of your eye. So we started testing monitors, running them at up to 80 or 90Hz, and I was able to determine at what point humans stop seeing flicker.

“Twenty years later, we were able to apply that knowledge to the strobing lights we use for Contour, making them flash on and off at a rate that is imperceptible to the human eye. Lo and behold, we can sync the camera-array system so that the shutters are only open when the lights are dark and only see the phosphor of the makeup. Because phosphor is emissive rather than reflective or retroflective, we can get a clean read without highlights or shadows.”

Of the lighting setup used with Contour, Perlman says, “The black lights do a good job of charging the phosphor in the makeup and are largely invisible to the RGB-color cameras used to capture the visual image of the subject. The lighting units are modified Kino Flo motion-picture fixtures fitted with both black-light and white-light tubes. Each holds four tubes, and we tend to mix them up to even out the illumination. Black lights are also placed all around the stage to evenly illuminate and charge the phosphor. The white lights are placed however you want to light the subject from the standpoint of beauty lighting. For example, if you want the subject to be in a half-light shadow, you would have the combined white and black lights on the illuminated side, and only black lights on the “dark” side. So the white light defines the normal, visible lighting, while the blacklights are there strictly to evenly charge up the phosphor. All the lights strobe during the capture process, with the phosphor glowing during the dark phases. This is all done in a darkened studio. Also, there is a key difference between fluorescence, the glowing illumination that occurs when phosphor is exposed to light, and phosphorescence, which is the afterglow. We’re relying on phosphorescence.”

Perlman notes that because the raised reference markers placed on the performer’s face for traditional mo-cap work are slightly offset from the surface of the skin, the resulting data is not always a precise representation of how that surface moves. By having the random phosphorescent patterns applied directly on the skin, Contour captures the geometry of the surface itself. By combining this detailed information with skeletal motion, Contour can also be used in conjunction with a marker-based system, allowing filmmakers to use the best of both technologies.

The only special requirement placed on the performer is that he or she must wear the phosphorescent makeup, which is mixed with a standard base and applied with a sponge like regular makeup. The subject must not touch or otherwise disturb the makeup once it is applied. Although a “smudge” will not alter the surface geometry as perceived by Contour, it will result in a discontinuity of any retrospectively tracked vertex that falls within the smudge. The system would continue to capture the performance with full 3-D resolution, but some post cleanup of the data would be necessary to link the pre-smudge vertex location with the post-smudge vertex location. Some post tweaking might also be needed for tracking vertices in areas of very high surface deformation, such as around the lips and eyes. (Mova expects that future versions of Contour will automate more of this process.)

Contour allows for multiple actors to be captured simultaneously, allowing for complex group scenes. The performers’ hand movements and gestures can also be captured. Contour relies on the ability of its cameras to have an unobstructed view of a given surface; if a hand is holding an object and only the outer surface of the hand is visible to the cameras, then Contour will only be able to reconstruct the outer surface.

Contour was designed to offer users on-set creative control that is close to what they expect with traditional cinematography. Although it typically takes an overnight render to reconstruct a full-resolution capture session, the system provides a low-res preview version of the finished 3-D reconstruction image that can be quickly generated on-set, allowing the cinematographer to properly light the subject for a desired effect and the director to check the performance. Reducing the amount of time required to create full-resolution imagery is simply a matter of applying more computing power to the processing. Full-resolution images in real time on set are possible with Contour today at a cost that could be justified by a large-scale production, but within a few years, given the steady advance of computing power, it will be within the reach of more modest production budgets.

Contour can also be adapted for use on any moving camera platform, even a Steadicam or Helmetcam, giving the user great creative latitude.

The system can even be used to capture the geometry and textures of textiles in motion. Clothing is time-consuming and difficult to faithfully simulate with CG animation techniques, but Contour can capture a garment’s exact geometry, motion and texture once it has been treated with a phosphor-based dye. Rather than donning the form-fitting Lycra suits necessary for marker-based mo-cap work, actors can be costumed for their characters, and Contour will capture the fabric’s motion and the actor’s motion simultaneously.

Perlman also foresees using Contour in conjunction with traditional stop-motion animation. “You just mix the phosphor in with the material being used, such as clay or silicone,” he explains. “The Corpse Bride was done with puppets made of silicone over metal armatures, while Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit was done with modeling clay. You would mix the phosphor in at a low-enough density that you wouldn’t notice it under normal stage lighting — you’d just see the normal colors of the silicone or the clay. But when you turn off the lights, it will glow, and because the phosphor is just a powder that is mixed in, there will be a random pattern to it.

“A complex shot like Wallace and Gromit driving through people’s gardens in a car is very expensive, because it contains so many different objects that must all be animated,” he continues. “You also have a motion-controlled camera that’s following the action. All this is very difficult to coordinate and execute. An alternative might be shooting the scene with Contour and breaking it into components on separate sets, lighting and animating them as you would normally, and then combining the images and rendering them in 3-D on a hi-def monitor for viewing. Because it’s now a digital version of the physical puppets, you would be able to composite characters and elements together using a tool like Maya for evaluation. In this case, Contour could be used to replace a motion-controlled camera, because once the digital information was captured, you would have full freedom of motion in 3-D; you could zoom in, pull back or fly through the air. And if you have a character that flies, rather than being forced to suspend the character with some sort of harness, you could just put it on a separate set and position it on the ground in the position you want it to be in when it’s flying.

“Also, if you wanted to reduce the audience’s perception of the strobing effect of stop-motion animation — or not, if that’s part of your artistic expression — you could just turn on motion blur in your 3-D package and instantly turn stop-motion into go-motion. So we think Contour could also dramatically lower the cost of stop-motion animation and afford a lot more creative control.

“In the parlance of computer graphics, Contour is the first technology to successfully cross the ‘Uncanny Valley,’ a perceptual zone where a CG face looks almost photo-real, but not quite photo-real. Such images are disturbing to the human visual system because our brain thinks it’s seeing a face with some defect. Humans don’t have that reaction to caricatures, such as cartoon faces, because we know they aren’t real. But as faces approach photo-real, either you are spot-on, or you have something worse than a caricature. Contour will give you a spot-on photo-real face. Then you can focus your energy on what you should be worrying about: making a great movie or video game.”

by David E. Williams

contact info:  
www.mova.com
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Kelly HiDef Depth-of-Field Calculator

The Guild of British Camera Technicians‘ HiDef Depth-of-Field Calculator (produced in association with Panavision Europe) is specifically designed for the new dedicated camera lenses used for shooting high-definition video for big-screen cinema. With scales for 16x9, 1.85:1 and 2.40:1 anamorphic and spherical digital-cinema projection, the Kelly HiDef Calculator has the same formatting as earlier Kellys but with a much finer optical circles-of-confusion standard — 4/10,000in. — employed for use with HD CCDs.

The HiDef Depth-of-Field Calculator is produced by motion-picture technicians for camera technicians in film and television and is designed to fit into a back pocket.

With Imperial scales on one side and Metric on the other, the calculator will yield at-a-glance depth-of-field and hyperfocal-distance properties for any lens size set at any aperture — invaluable for factoring in distances and available aperture settings when working out accurate split- or deep-focus shots.

The Kelly HiDef Calculator is a beneficial tool because in things to do with focus, any perceived depth of field is a factor of image magnification. Eye-focusing through the camera, or by reference to a monitor, does not give an accurate picture of what will be seen on a large screen, where that same image will be blown up to several thousand times its original size.

The HiDef Depth-of-Field Calculator has scales for 5mm, 7mm, 10mm, 14mm, 20mm, 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 75mm and 100mm HD lenses.

The HiDef Depth-of-Field Calculator retails for £29.99/C=43 plus £2.50/C=3.55 p&p. Price includes U.K. VAT.

contact info:
To order, call the GBCT, 011-41 (0)20 8813 1999
 
admin@gbct.org
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Bella Corporations Catapult

Bella Corporation, a company focused on designing and producing innovative products for the consumer and broadcast video markets, introduced the Catapult at NAB 2006. Allowing capture of video footage from DV or HDV video cameras directly to iPods or almost any USB drive, the Catapult eliminates the time consuming task of digitizing video footage.

A battery-powered device not much larger than a Blackberry, the Catapult offers a standard USB 2.0 connection to take advantage of many popular storage devices. With this in mind, the Catapult has a piggyback neoprene pouch designed to hold an iPod or 2-½” USB drive.

In addition to capturing digital video, the Catapult adds features such as time-lapse recording, trigger recording (permitting the use of a remote switch or a motion detector trigger), and pre- and post-record functions.

Utilizing built-in rechargeable batteries, the Catapult is capable of continuous recording in excess of three hours and also includes an AC adaptor. Furthermore, the Catapult can be configured using either a Windows or a Macintosh computer, and the “Configurator” allows the user to save settings for up to four presets.

Designed to work with DV and HDV cameras that include a FireWire connection (such as those from Sony, Canon, JVC and Panasonic), the Catapult will be available in the second half of 2006 and will be priced under $300.

Online Online Exclusive
contact info:  
www.Bella-USA.com
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Da Vinci Systems Resolve V3.2

Da Vinci Systems has announced the release of Resolve V3.2, the latest version of its Resolve nonlinear color-enhancement system.

Adding enhanced tools for 10-bit, real-time log grading, Resolve V3.2 provides colorists with the digital tools needed to enhance material intended for high-resolution film. Colorists can now use film-centric controls to adjust low lights, highlights, and brightness, and da Vinci’s exclusive Transformer image-processing accelerator allows them to reposition 10-bit log files in real time, with rotation, at excellent quality.

Resolve V3.2 also adds Polygon Windows, which permit colorists to generate isolation areas with up to 100 points, drawing intricate shapes to precisely match and isolate specific areas of the image. Polygon Windows can also be object-tracked and combined with other isolations, including circles, quadrilaterals and keys, and they feature added softness adjustments for enhanced flexibility.

Additional features of Resolve V3.2 include support for the Cinespace color management system, expanded tools to speed the conforming process (allowing automatic conflict resolution when handling EDLs) and support for both the 64-bit and 32-bit versions of the CXFS file system, a proprietary SAN from Silicon Graphics, which allows Resolve to work in an SGI SAN environment, as well as with the ADIC StorNext file system.

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contact info:  
www.davsys.com
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Da Vinci Systems Splice

Following on the heels of its release of Resolve V3.2, da Vinci Systems has unveiled Splice, a new product that creates a “virtual telecine” for the da Vinci 2K Plus.

Giving users the real-time benefits of traditional telecine control (pan, tilt, zoom and rotate) in a nonlinear workflow, Splice blends key technologies from da Vinci’s Resolve DI Mastering Suite, including the new Transformer engine, to allow new and existing da Vinci 2K/2K Plus users to conform, transform, grade, arrange, and deliver images in any order in real time. Operationally, Splice presents itself as a new device on the 2K control panel and provides operators with types of controls one would normally only associate with a telecine environment.

Splice also offers compatibility with other da Vinci technologies, including local and SAN interfaces to both ADIC and SGI CXFS based storage networks. With previously stored material such as 2K scans, colorists now have instant access to all material, in any order, and can “splice” together images in the exact presentation order required. From there, they can grade in context, eliminating the guesswork and constant shuttling and reel changing required in a linear tape-to-tape or telecine-based workflow. Material can be sorted subsequently in source order and played out for deliverables, letting colorists visually match color looks from scene to scene.

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contact info:  
www.davsys.com
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Multibridge Extreme

Blackmagic Design has introduced to the postproduction world the Multibridge Extreme bi-directional converter featuring built-in PCI Express.

Working natively in 4:2:2, RGB 4:4:4, and 2K digital film resolutions, the Multibridge Extreme features 14-bit analog conversion with uncompressed video capture/playback and 4:4:4 RGB 12-bit color space. Drivers for Apple Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows compatibility are also included, as is dual-link DVI-D and HDMI monitoring with 10-bit customizable look-up tables.

Real-time down conversion from HD to SD is supported in playback or when used as an independent converter, and Multibridge Extreme can also scale video up to high-resolution 30-inch LCD monitors in real time. Lastly, a built-in USB connection will allow new processing features to be easily added as Blackmagic releases them.

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contact info:  
www.blackmagic-design.com
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Panther Foxy Advanced Crane System and New HQ

Panther Dollies and Cranes has announced the opening of its North American headquarters at 801 S. Main St, Burbank, CA 91506. The announcement coincided with NAB 2006 and the introduction of the new Panther Foxy Advanced Crane System.

Expanding on the proven performance of the Foxy Crane System, the Foxy Advanced considerably increases the payload while extending the remote version to an overall length of 43’ and permitting the cameraman to glide as much as 24'above the ground.

Other features of the Foxy Advanced Crane System include double bracing, a flexible handle for easy operation, a patented transport solution for easy handling, a monitor holder, a brake for track wheels, a detachable platform board for special shots, a push bar and practical weight transportation.

Panther’s product line also includes the electro-mechanical dolly systems Classic and Evolution, as well as the Galaxy Crane System (the world’s largest man-rideable crane system) and a wide range of production accessories including jib arms, track, risers, and other camera support equipment.


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contact info:
(818) 841-3110
 
www.panther.us
info@panther.us
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Celcos Fury 4K, Firestorm 2X and Hollywood HQ

Celco, a leader in digital film-recording systems, has unleashed the Fury 4K digital film recorder. Celco’s fastest, highest-resolution recorder to date, the Fury 4K features a dramatic improvement in speed for full range, 10-bit log, 4K imagery onto Kodak 2242 color intermediate negative stock. In addition, the Fury 4K utilizes Celco’s newly developed electro-magnetic beam control system to produce significantly sharper 4K images. The system is also capable of outputting to virtually any type of film stock, including color and black-and-white intermediate and camera negative stocks.

The complete Fury 4K system will be delivered with Celco’s FilmOut Pro Graphical User Interface (GUI) software, which controls the film recorder and includes a variety of image processing and viewing tools in a user friendly, easy to understand environment. FilmOut Pro allows the operator to define aspect ratios and formats, and provides image cropping, offset, and resizing tools. Also included are selectable image-sharpening algorithms and degrain functions, as well as an automated color management tool and an interactive A/B image comparison slider. Bundled with the FilmOut Pro software is FinalView, an image-viewing tool that gives the operator a final view of the image on film to verify everything is correct before the image is sent to the recorder.

Also in the way of digital film recorders, Celco has unveiled the Firestorm 2X, building on the already established Firestorm 2 line. Outputting a high-resolution frame of film in 1.4 seconds (50-percent faster than the original Firestorm), the Firestorm 2X is a low cost, high-speed film recorder that utilizes Celco’s new XCRT Advanced Imaging Technology and incorporates Celco’s FilmOut Pro software.

The Firestorm 2X’s 1.4-second-per-frame speed includes high-definition images onto Kodak 5201 or 5245 negative stock. The system is also capable of imaging to intermediate stock (Kodak 2242) and high-speed output of any resolution up to 4K or higher for larger format purposes such as 65mm. Taking only 12 seconds per frame to output a 4K 15-perf Imax frame onto Kodak 5201 low-ASA camera negative stock, the Firestorm 2X can also output multiple film stocks, including color and black-and-white intermediate and camera negative stocks in addition to outputting to multiple formats such as 16mm, 35mm and 65mm 5-, 8-, 10- and 15-perf. The system also has the option of adding Celco’s newly developed 2000’ split film magazines.

Celco has also announced that both the Fury 4K and Firestorm 2X recorders will be powered by Red Hat Linux-based operating software. Film recorders shipping in the 3rd quarter and beyond will ship with Linux software and PC hardware as part of the complete film recorder package.

Finally, Celco has opened a new office in Hollywood to complement its facility in Rancho Cucamonga, California, and its electron optics division in Mahwah, New Jersey. Located at Raleigh Studios, 5300 Melrose Ave, Chaplin Building, Suite 663, Los Angeles, CA 90004, the new location also features three screening rooms.

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contact info:
Celco
(909) 481-4648

 
www.celco.com
info@celco.com
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BaseMatte from Reflecmedia

Introduced at NAB 2006 and planned for release later this year, UK-based chroma key specialist Reflecmedia has unveiled BaseMatte (still a working title), the newest product in its Chromatte line.

Designed specifically for use on the floor, the BaseMatte can be used as either a single piece (lining up perfectly with a ChromaFlex backing, allowing users to easily key a full body shot with feet), or it can be purchased as tiles to suit any installation.

Lightweight and easy to carry, the BaseMatte will be supplied in a specially manufactured carry bag, keeping it in line with all other Reflecmedia products. To learn more about BaseMatte and the range of products offered by Reflecmedia, visit www.reflecmedia.com.

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contact info:

 
www.reflecmedia.com
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PFClean V2.0, PFTrack V3.0 from the Pixel Farm

The Pixel Farm, a company focused on innovation in the field of high-end digital postproduction, utilized NAB 2006 to unveil a number of new products and services.

First, version 2.0 of the Pixel Farm’s image clean up and preparation application, PFClean, was introduced, building on the popularity of the original PFClean that was launched at the end of last year. With its ability to automatically preprocess and clean up images of any resolution, PFClean has proved to be a significant timesaver when it comes to dust busting and rig/wire removal. Other features include an extensive paint, grain, and effects toolset, support for all major platforms, scalable architecture and an economic price point.

Next up this year is PFTrack V3.0. With over 30 new features, V3.0 can now track many separate moving objects within a sequence, as well as solve camera-motion issues. And with the addition of the unique geometry tracking, V3.0 allows 3-D geometry to be imported into PFTrack and then matched to sequences. Furthermore, the new fully editable F curves within PFTrack make cleaning up tracking data easy and accurate, allowing users to view and edit each individual property of the camera within a graph editor in the timeline. Once edited, the new camera solver produces a new camera without the need to totally re-solve every parameter in the sequence. Other features include new, fully integrated image-based modeling capabilities that allow users to quickly build up 3-D environments by using the background image as a guide; integrated Z-depth extraction tools; new optical flow tools; semi-automatic lens distortion correction; reference frame support; an enhanced interface; new import/export options including Roto Splines; and the ability to snap test objects to features.

Finally, the Pixel Farm has also announced a collaboration with Cooke Optics Ltd in which the Pixel Farm will develop its PFTrack software to work in conjunction with in-camera data acquired via Cooke’s revolutionary /i Technology. The collaboration is aimed at developing tools designed for use throughout the entire production process, helping the production community to further enhance it postproduction capabilities while saving time and money.

The Cooke S4/i system will work via an /i data link that will seamlessly and effortlessly record all camera and lens settings, including focal length, on a per-frame basis, all synced to time code. The information is recorded as metadata during filming and given to the post facility, guaranteeing that the relevant lens data will be available and ensuring even more accurate calibration of shots in post. Initially, this will be available in PFTrack with plans to include the system in other PF products at a later date.

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contact info:


 
www.thepixelfarm.co.uk
info@thepixelfarm.co.uk
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Baselight HD, Northlight 2, and Truelight Colourist from FilmLight

FilmLight, a leading provider of digital filmmaking technology, has unveiled the Baselight HD grading system, the Northlight 2 film scanner, and the Truelight Colourist Package.

First, Baselight HD will offer colorists a complete package including a Baselight grading system with HD and SD video I/O specifically designed for video grading and a Baselight Blackboard control surface. Additionally, FilmLight has revealed the entire range of Baselight grading systems will eventually contain a new purpose-built computer platform system. The new 16 processor (Octal dual core Opteron) 5U rack with 8TB formatted RAID disk capacity will provide enough space for more than 10 hours of HD footage. Moreover, the Blackboard control surface will include a separate PC for the Graphical User Interface and Blackboard, allowing all 16 cores in the processing node to be used for grading and allowing the grading suite itself to be located some distance from the machine room.

Ideally suited for long-form scanning in all film formats at the highest quality for visual effects, digital intermediate, restoration and long-form television production, the Northlight 2 builds on the success of the original Northlight scanner, bringing a 4x increase in scanning speed — the new scanner is faster than two frames per second at 2K and one frame per second at 4K. Other features include a new reflective lens design, 8K CCD line arrays (reduced to 4K in the head electronics, providing true alias-free 4K resolution), and a new infrared channel option that assists with automated dust busting, delivering a key channel to trigger third-party repair software downstream.

Lastly, the Truelight Colourist Package has been designed as a plug-and-play cost effective solution comprising a Truelight SDi or DVI real-time processing box, a probe, software and output profiles. Allowing colorists to easily add Truelight print emulation to their non-Baselight grading systems, the Colourist Package also features a single-button calibration and update of the Truelight box with profiles that accurately characterize the grading monitor or projector. Additional options include a probe shoe and tripod; additional Truelight SDi or DVI boxes; an update to Cubebuilder (software only), adding the ability to incorporate project-specific calibration of film stock, film recorder, and lab; Truelight Shake or Digital Fusion visual-effects plugins; and on-site technical training and consultancy.

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contact info: 
www.filmlight.ltd.uk
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Bluefish444 Catalyst

Bluefish444 has unleashed the Catalyst 2K DSP hardware processing 16-bit RGB video card into the waters of digital postproduction.

Sporting dual 1GHz digital serial processors interacting with a field-programmable gate array to create multiple layers of uncompressed real-time video processing, the Catalyst supports all resolutions from 2K to SD with digital I/Os as well as analog monitoring for 2K real-time preview. Specifically, Catalyst supports dual-link 4:4:4 and 4:4:4:4 for 12/10/8-bit RGB I/O, dual-link 4:2:2:4 (YUV) for video and key I/O and single link 4:2:2 (YUV) I/O. Catalyst also supports two independent SDI streams, allowing applications to capture and playback two SDI video streams simultaneously.

Additional features of the Catalyst video card include internal hardware overlay, signal format conversion, RT hardware effects, 16-bit RGB pixel format, digital audio, PCI-X 133MHz, expandability, professional broadcast genlock, and a software development kit. Furthermore, every Bluefish444 card comes bundled free with Symmetry, providing a seamless acquisition, review and playout station for all Windows production environments. Able to capture Cineon, DPX, Targa, QuickTime and AVI files, Symmetry dispenses with loss issues associated with color conversion by giving the user the choice of which color space best suits his or her needs, from 8-bit YUV up to 16-bit RGB.

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contact info: 
www.bluefish444.com
info@bluefish444.com
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PT20 & PT24 Pan & Tilt Systems; 300 and 4000 Series Jib Arms from the Camera Turret Company

The Camera Turret Company, a division of Camera Turret Technologies Inc, offers pan-and-tilt systems as well as jib arms to the film and video industries.

In the way of pan-and-tilt systems, both the PT20 and the PT24 are available. Both systems come complete with a digital controller, a 12V power supply, and a 20’ pan/tilt cable, but where the PT20 weighs in at 6.5 lbs and can support up to 20 lbs, the PT24 weighs 8 lbs and has a capacity of 30 lbs. Features of the digital controller include auto ramping when the user moves too quickly on start up or slow down, speed limit control, center dead-spot control and linear or logarithmic joystick settings. Available accessories include a wireless system for use up to 1,000’; 20’, 50’ and 100’ cable extensions; jib and tripod adapter plates; wall mounts; and special systems for multiple pan/tilt control.

Two jib arms are also available from the Camera Turret Company, the 300 Series and the 4000 Series. The 300 Series boasts strong and durable 6061 aluminum construction; 3’, 6’, 9’ and 12’ setup positions; portability; and easy setup. Furthermore, the jib supports both over- and underslung camera positions and features a cable system that allows the user to go nearly vertical. Weight capacity for the 300 Series drops off as extensions are added: 50 lbs at 3’, 40 lbs at 6’, 35 lbs at 9’ and 20 lbs at 12’. The jib also features a unique weight system that adjusts weight leverage with the turn of a knob, eschewing the traditional fussing with small weights. Available accessories include a monitor bracket, vertical brake system, 6’ extension, 9’ extension, 12’ extension, and a weight extension.

To learn more about these products (including the 4000 Series jib that extends up to 18’ with a capacity of 30 lbs) and others from the Camera Turret Company, see contact information below.

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contact info:
Camera Turret Company
(781) 585-7400
 
www.cameraturret.com
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FrontNiche HD-SDI TFT LCD Monitors

FrontNiche offers a full line of HD-SDI TFT LCD screens, ranging from 6.4" to 57" and covering all the bases in between. All of the monitors tout advanced video processing technology developed exclusively by Vutrix, including TruMotionHD (1080i adaptive deinterlacing that maintains optimal image sharpness and resolution), FineEdge (dynamic directional interpolation that eliminates jaggy artifacts), Fidelity Engine (image enhancements that remove unwanted noise and improve overall detail), and RealityExpansion (10/16-bit image processing).

More specifically, the 23", 37", 47" and 57" monitors feature 8ms, 1920x1080 HD-SDI TFT LCD displays with advanced color temperature and gamma correction facilities (to R65) with the capability of displaying all HD formats, including 23.98 psf, with native 1920x1080 and the Pixel-to-Pixel (no scaling) and Pixel-Locked digital-video processing technology developed by Vutrix. Optional 4:4:4 10/12-bit RGB dual-link and VWFM, user adjustable controls for brightness, contrast, backlight, black stretch, RGB gains, gamma, color temperature, and overscan are also included.

Also available are 17", 23", 26", 32", and 40" models with 1366x768, HD-SDI, 8ms, optional network and integrated quad, with optional UMD/Talley and calibrated audio PPM; a 7" 800x480 HD-SDI model with single or dual rack-mount tray and optional features including single or dual-link VWFM/video analyzer display; a Triple 6.4” HD-SDI rack-mount tray with optional UMD/Talley and calibrated audio PPM; and a 56" 3840x2160 model with integrated Quad and 4:4:4 dual-link native 2K HSDL and beyond.

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contact info:
FrontNiche
(928) 821-0121
 
www.frontnichena.com
sales@frontnichena.com
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Elipz from Anton Bauer

Targeting the increasingly popular DV and HDV prosumer camera systems, Anton Bauer has introduced the Elipz generation of battery, light and grip products created specifically to enhance runtime, performance and ergonomics.

Employing high-capacity lithium-ion cells, the Elipz 10k battery delivers all-day operating times for a typical 10-watt handheld camera. The patent-pending under-the-camera mounting design allows one face of the lightweight Elipz battery to attach to the camera through a shoe-type mount similar to quick-change tripod adapters. On the other face of the battery, a ¼-20 mounting thread provides an easy standard interface with monopods and tripods. Delivering as much as nine hours of runtime to cameras including the Sony HVR-Z1U, Canon GL2 and Panasonic AJ-DVX100 and AG-HVX200, the Elipz 10k battery forms a strong and stable camera platform that lowers the camera’s center of gravity while handheld.

Complementing the new Elipz 10k battery, Anton Bauer has also announced the ElightZ, a 6-volt on-camera light designed to work with a handheld camera battery without power converters, adapters or belt packs. Weighing only 6 ounces and drawing only 10 watts (both five- and 15-watt bulbs are available), the ElightZ still manages to output more than 75 footcandles at 5’. Furthermore, its folding design features a two-stage arm that can be adjusted to a wide array of positions to adjust light angles and avoid lens shadowing.

Rounding out the Elipz system is the new EgripZ camera support, a comfortable, flexible grip that offers virtually limitless operating positions without adding unnecessary weight or constraint. Attaching easily to any camera and weighing only 12 ounces, the EgripZ also features a ¼-20 mounting screw so that it can be mounted to a tripod or monopod for quick and easy stationary support.

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contact info:
Anton Bauer
(203) 929-1100
 
www.antonbauer.com
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Porta-Jibs Porta-Slide and Free-Styler Jr.

Porta-Jib, the company that has brought us FlexTrak, Spider Dollies and a range of Jib Arms, has added the Porta-Slide and Free-Styler Jr. to its lineup.

Available in 48" and 24" versions, with or without the panning mechanism, the new Porta-Slide is ideal for small moves when a dolly is not available, allowing, for example, the camera to be positioned over tabletops or right up against a wall. Additionally, the 24" Porta-Slide will fit on the end of most jib arms, creating another axis of movement or allowing the operator’s right hand to be on the fluid head’s pan bar without being obstructed by the vertical lift of the jib. And when the 24" Porta-Slide is mounted on a dolly, it can be used as a correcting tool, compensating for a missed mark.

Building on the principles of the original Free-Styler, the Free-Styler Jr. works with any small camera (13 lbs or less) and on most 100mm front jibs. Furthermore, the Free-Styler Jr. is capable of pointing straight down, and controlling the Free-Styler from below allows for higher angle shots than are possible with a traditional fluid head.

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contact info:
Porta-Jib
(323) 462-2855
 
www.porta-jib.com
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Transvideo StarliteColor LCD Monitor

The good people at Transvideo have unveiled the new 4" StarliteColor LCD monitor. Offering the compactness of a flip-out screen with the quality of a professional viewfinder, the StarliteColor is switchable between color, green screen and black-and-white.

With wide viewing angles and a high contrast ratio, the StarliteColor is designed to operate in full sun without a hood. For extremely bright environments with a lot of reflected light (such as snow and sea), the SuperBright option offers an extra kick without sacrificing the details in the blacks and without washing out the image.

Sporting an aluminum anti-vibration housing and protective glass to ensure continuous operation in the most challenging environments, the StarliteColor also features a user-friendly interface with potentiometers for tint, saturation, contrast and sharpness and advanced adjustments for display modes, aspect ratios, flips and more. Furthermore, the potentiometers are user-programmable for the operator’s ease of use.

Other features include multi-standard compatibility (NTSC, PAL, SECAM); switchable viewing from 4:3 to 16:9; full, underscan and broadcast modes; sharpness adjustment for focus control; flips and monitor reverse; and input from 8.5V to 36V DC.

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contact info:
Transvideo International
(818) 985-4903
 
www.transvideointl.com
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Fraunhofer Megacine

Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS has developed a new portable field recorder for digital cinema, high definition and standard definition. Known as Megacine, the portable field recorder offers small size, comfortable handling, and up to eight hours of recording time for uncompressed image data, which is stored in a modularly designed mini-RAID array of up to 16 notebook hard-disk drives with a current storage capacity of about 1TB.

Measuring 11.5"x8"x8", the Megacine can record 45 minutes uncompressed, lossless HDTV resolution (10-bit RGB 4:4:4) 1080/25 psf or DC (digital cinema) resolution (12-bit 4:4:4 XYZ) 1080/24p. Recorded sequences can then be played back in the same quality as they were captured or can be down-converted into other standards or frame rates.

The recorder has an integrated 640x480-pixel display, and a preview in a smaller format is also possible. Furthermore, the onscreen display and the integrated keypad allow the input of the configuration setup.

Serving as an external hard disk, Megacine stores each video frame separately as an independent file, making direct access for nonlinear editing immediately possible. Data transmission with the host computer is realized via FireWire (IEEE 1394a) with approximately 400Mbit/s or Fibrechannel with 2 Gbit/s. Lastly, audio and ancillary data such as time code and other metadata that are transmitted in the HD-SDI stream can be stored together with the image data.

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contact info:  
www.iis.fraunhofer.de
info@iis.fraunhofer.de
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Zylights Z50 LED

Zylight has announced the Z50 Intelligent LED light, a fixture that the company is calling the first in a line of next-generation LED lighting instruments. Designed under license from Color Kinetics, a leading innovator of LED lighting systems and technologies, the Z50 is able to instantly change from fully calibrated 5600°K to 3200°K white light with the push of a button. Or, when switched to creative color mode, the Z50 can output any color of the rainbow — including pastels — eliminating the need for gels with the unit. And to simplify the creative possibilities, the Z50 features presets for favorite color selections.

Zylight’s HD-LED technology packs over 230 LEDs into a single square inch, producing a soft, wide output with no hotspots. An included adapter allows professionals to mount any existing 3” lighting accessory they may already have, such as a barndoor or snoot.

Small enough to fit in the palm of a hand, the Z50 can be powered from any 9-20-volt source such as an Anton Bauer PowerTap, or powered from AC. Available kits include all necessary cables and mounting adapters as well as a flexible NOGA arm for easy camera mounting.

Also included in the new Z50 is Zylight’s ZyLink wireless technology, allowing lighting professionals to wirelessly link together multiple Z50s to create large, soft sources of calibrated light. Z50s that are linked together act in concert as if they were one unified LED source, with adjustments made on one light changing all of the lights in the group.

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contact info:
 
www.zylight.com
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Mesh from Pandora

Pandora International has introduced Mesh freeform color-correction software and a Data File workflow that promises true collaborative color correction.

Unveiled at NAB 2006, Mesh is a new way to isolate and manipulate color using Pandora’s accelerated software color-correction platform, Revolution. Mesh displays a grid of points across the image where levels between each point are smoothly interpolated to produce a mesh to modulate the intensity of the color correction layer applied to the image. Able to work independently or combined with either a color isolation channel or a shape, Mesh adjusts the intensity of the color correction channel at each point or, grouping all of the points together, it allows all of the points to be set to 0 to remove the color correction layer, after which a pen can paint the color correction back into the image. As with all of Pandora’s systems, Mesh is a real-time, render-free operation that is monitored in full resolution and has been fully integrated into the Pogle control system.

Also on the docket at NAB, Pandora discussed its Data File workflow, which integrates the flexibility of resolution-independent color correction and powerful EDL management software to enable SAN-hosted material to be viewed and processed within a fully real-time nonlinear environment. In this workflow, offline EDLs can address files to produce grade conforms and color timing lists that allow for full collaboration between compositing/graphics workstations, the color processing suite, and the SAN or video-based workflow.

Among the key benefits of this approach are the ability to directly lay material to tape at any time and in source or conform order; the interactive sharing of material between workstations and color suites as compositing and 3-D effects are progressing; and the sharing of expensive resources such as noise processors that can be accessed by multiple color suites on an “on request” basis as the system is always live.

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contact info:
 
www.pandora-int.com
sales@pandora-int.com
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Phantom Digital Widescreen Cinema

Vision Research has announced its line of Phantom Digital Widescreen Cinema cameras, which is launching with the Phantom HD and the Phantom 65.

Both cameras tout a selectable 11-stop tonal range for a contrast ratio of 2048:1; hot-swappable, non-volatile 128-Gigabyte solid-state memory magazines; multi-format compatibility (24p, HD-SDI, 720p, 1080p, 1080i, NTSC, PAL); SMPTE time code; compatibility with live broadcast, television, or cinema production; multiple camera synchronization; viewfinder port with HD-SDI or composite video output; circular or linear image buffer; on-chip shuttering, variable to two microseconds; and variable frame rates in 1-frame-per-second increments.

The Phantom HD features a 2.0-megapixel SR-CMOS sensor with a full 16x9 aspect ratio and 1920x1080 interactive pixels (24mm x 13.5mm). 35mm cinema compatible, the Phantom HD can run at speeds up to 1,000 fps at the full aspect ratio and can accept PL mount lenses and others.

For those interested in large format work, the Phantom 65 features a 10.0-megapixel SR-CMOS sensor with a full 2.2:1 aspect ratio and 4096x2440 active pixels (51.2mm x 23.25mm). 70mm compatible, the camera accepts M645 lenses and can run at speeds up to 125 fps.

In terms of memory, the Phantom HD comes with 4GB DRAM internal memory, while the 65 features 2GB DRAM internal memory. Available memory options for both cameras include 8GB and 16GB DRAM internal memory, a 128GB non-volatile flash-memory magazine with docking station, and a dual fiber streaming output to Image3 intensive image storage system.

Other features of the Phantom camera system include a circular camera roll that begins recording images the moment the camera is powered on or a linear roll for shooting in a more traditional style; control over contrast ratio, gamma and color balance; and compatibility with cine-style lenses, matteboxes and filters.

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contact info:
Vision Research
(800) 737-6588
 
www.visionresearch.com
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Imagica Imager HSR

Imagica Corp, one of the largest postproduction companies in Japan and a leading supplier of digital-imaging products for digital-intermediate- and digital-cinema applications, recently announced a number of new products.

Expediting the DI workflow, Imagica is rolling out new systems that bookend the DI pipeline, including the Imager HSR film recorder and the Imager HSX film scanner. For the front end of the pipeline, the Imager HSX features scan times of 1 frame of 4K media each second, or 3 frames per second at 2K. Utilizing a newly developed CMOS-area sensor and LED-illumination system, the HSX also offers such options as an integrated KeyKode reader and 35mm Wetgate. At the tail end of the workflow, delivering high-speed and high-quality film recording, the Imager HSR can record 3 frames of 2K-formatted files per second.

Imager HSR was built on pioneering recorder technology licensed from Eastman Kodak Company. Combining a newly-developed optical engine with JVC’s D-ILA LCOS imaging device, the HSR also features LED illumination to record motion-picture data to Eastman Kodak 5242 intermediate film for interpositive or internegative films. Additionally, Imager HSR and HSX systems support 10-bit Cineon and DPX files.

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contact info:
 
www.imagica-la.com
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Imagica Imager XE Advanced Plus and 35mm Wetgate

Also available from Imagica is the Imager XE Advanced Plus, a true 4K scanner offering fast scanning of 4K material with optional resolution capability up to 8K. Equipped with a custom-designed tri-linear CCD camera system, including 14-bit AD conversion with 16-bit image processing, the Imager XE Advanced Plus boasts a full density range of color negative.

Complementing the XE Advanced Plus product line, Imagica now offers a 35mm Wetgate as an option, further helping to eliminate the effects of scratches, digs, and other imperfections when transferring, restoring or printing film. Utilizing a chemical, fluid-based process to fill imperfections on the film negative, the 35mm Wetgate is already in operation at several facilities.
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contact info:
 
www.imagica-la.com
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Imagicas Primatte

Last but not least in the new lineup from Imagica is a new version of the Primatte chroma key technology. According to Scott Gross, Primatte product manager at Imagica Corp, the new version includes a “new core library [that] has been fine-tuned and features floating point precision, SSE2 and nVidia GPU acceleration, film grain removal and a new Auto-Compute feature.”

As a result of the new core library, Imagica’s Primatte plug-ins for Avid Softimage DS 7.6 and 8.0 and the Primatte sparks for the Autodesk Media and Entertainment SGI products (Inferno, Flame, Fire, Flint and Smoke) also take advantage of the new features and advanced performance. Furthermore, the new Primatte for OFX plugin will work with Nucoda Film Master, Assimilate Scratch, Thompson/Grass Valley Bones, SGO Mistika, FilmLight Baselight, DVS Clipster and Autodesk Toxik. The plugin is available for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and IRIX operating systems.

Primatte is also currently available as a plug-in for Avid’s AVX 1.5 products (Adrenaline, Media Composer, Symphony XpressPro), Imagineer System’s mokey and monet, Apple Shake and Motion, Autodesk Burn, Adobe After Effects, Photoshop, and Photoshop Elements, Interactive Effects’ Piranha, Eyeon’s Digital Fusion and the Quantel eQ and iQ products.

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contact info:
 
www.imagica-la.com
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Autodesk Toxic 2007; Discreet Inferno on Linux

At NAB 2006, Autodesk announced two new software packages for the postproduction community, Autodesk Toxik 2007 and Discreet Inferno for the Linux operating system.

Building on the original Autodesk Toxik digital-compositing software, which was introduced in 2005, Toxik 2007 offers a range of new capabilities, including a Paint system that allows interactive painting of high-resolution, high-dynamic-range imagery (HDRI), which contains extensive color and lighting information ranging from direct sunlight to the deepest shadows, giving digital artists more creative options than traditional digital imagery. The new Paint feature also simplifies such tasks as wire and rig removal, retouching and digital matte painting, while increasing accuracy by allowing artists to view downstream composites in context.

Other new features in Autodesk Toxik 2007 include increased interoperability with other Autodesk creative systems, optimized support for AMD processors in addition to Intel, improvements to the Toxik animation system, the Master Keyer extension tools (which simplify complex keying tasks, improve keying and tracking precision, and allow artists to refine mattes and masks faster and with greater control), and automated administrative and management tasks.

Also from Autodesk, with a robust creative toolset for high-speed compositing, advanced graphics and interactive design, the Academy Award-winning Discreet Inferno was first made available on the Linux operating system in November 2005 exclusively for the Japanese market. As a result of the system’s success and global customer interest, the Linux-based Discreet Inferno system will now be available worldwide on an IBM dual-core AMD workstation. Additionally, the Discreet Inferno system is already available on the IRIX operating system.

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contact info: 
www.autodesk.com
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Doremi Nugget HD Video Player

Building on its product line, Doremi labs has added new features and enhancements for its Nugget HD Video Player and new remote-control software for its HD Video Test Generator and Video Converters.

The new Nugget HD Video Player features GigaBit Ethernet for faster file transfers from computers, a logo generator that superimposes a 20-by-20 pixel image on the video stream, and fixed latency and chase for multi-unit synchronization. Additionally, the Nugget is available in a hot-swap pullout drive configuration. To facilitate the Ethernet transfer of popular file formats such as MPEG2 video to the Nugget’s internal hard drive, the Nugget will also start to ship with the new Doremi Asset Manager software.

Able to play HD and SD video files up to 80Mbits/sec (4:2:2 and 4:2:0), the Nugget is housed in a 1RU chassis and is available in a standard and pro version. The standard version features composite and DVI video outputs, six channels analog and IEC-958 audio. The Nugget Pro adds HD-SDI and SDI video outputs, LTC in/out, Sync input, ASI input, six channels AES/EBU digital audio and more. Finally, the Nugget is also available in a 2RU chassis with a removable hard drive.

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contact info:  
www.doremilabs.com
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Formatt HD Filters

Formatt Filters has launched a new range of glass filters designed specifically for high-definition picture acquisition. The result of extensive R&D over the last three years, the range has been developed to meet industry demand for improved HD image quality during acquisition, giving cinematographers new creative options as they shoot with HD cameras.

Currently, the lineup of new HD filters includes HD Soft, HD Neutral Density, HD Clear UV, HD Soft Gold and Supersoft Gold, as well as HD Linear and Circular Polarizers. In addition to these HD-specific filters, Formatt has also tested its standard filter range to designate filters that meet all of the performance criteria for high definition, resulting in what Formatt calls a complete range of filters that can be used with all types of HD cameras.

All of the new HD filters are available in standard sizes of 3x3, 4x4, 6x4, 5x5, 4x5.65 and 6x6, with circular filters available in sizes from 58mm to 138mm. Additionally, non-standard sizes can be made to order, and all of the HD filters, while designed specifically for HD cameras, can be used with all types of cameras, including 16mm, 35mm and SD video.

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contact info: 
www.formatt.co.uk
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Miller Sprinter II

Miller Camera Support has introduced the Sprinter II tripod. Aimed at the ENG market, the Sprinter II features a carbon fiber torsion-free design that Miller claims makes the tripod 50-percent faster to set up and break down.

Additional features of the Sprinter II include dual-action leg locks, mid-level spreader with adjustable center hub, inline carry handle, Forever-Flat rubber foot design, rapid-action transport clips, and one-point leg lock adjustment.

The Sprinter II is available in three models, the one-stage 1589 and the two-stage 1580 and 1576. Additionally, Miller offers a range of Arrow fluid heads to complement the tripods.


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www.millertripods.com
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HD Mini Probe, Birds Eye, and Z Shuttle from Innovision

Designed specifically for the Panasonic AG-HVX200 and DVX100B, Sony HVR-Z1U and HDR-FX1 and similar DV camcorders, the HD Mini Probe tubular lens system features a 19” long lens barrel with a diameter of 1.4”, a 72mm rear thread (guaranteeing compatibility with most popular DV camcorders), edge-to-edge sharpness, flat field, extreme depth of field, and state-of-the-art multiple coatings to provide sharp, low dispersion images. Additionally, the HD Mini Probe is waterproof to a depth of 17”.
Next up, the Bird’s Eye lightweight portable camera support column combines a smooth-moving pan-and-tilt head with a modular telescoping column system, making the support ideally suited to shooting from an overhead, elevated camera position.

Weighing under 50 lbs and constructed of sturdy galvanized steel, the Bird’s Eye four-stage telescoping center column expands to a height of 15', enabling camera height adjustment from 1'-16'. Dual-locking bolts in each stage anchor the extended column firmly into position, and extra stability is provided by adjustable ground spreaders and an adjustable floor stand. Furthermore, the remote-controlled head accommodates cameras weighing up to 10 lbs, is capable of panning and tilting a full 360°, and is operated by joystick control. And when wrap is called, the Bird’s Eye dismantles quickly for storage in the system’s set of carrying bags.

Lastly, the Z Shuttle tracking system combines a smooth gliding camera platform — traveling a 131'-long ceiling-mounted track — with a vertical arm that can drop the camera down to a subject’s eye level. Programmable for up to eight sequenced camera positions, Z Shuttle is capable of traveling at variable speeds of up to 3.3' per second, with a pan-and-tilt speed of 90° per second and a Z-axis arm speed of 1.6' per second. Operated via a small remote control unit, the Z Shuttle is equipped with a touchscreen control panel and foot pedal for manual control and programmable movement during on-air broadcasts. Innovision recently completed installation of a Z Shuttle system at the TVN 24 broadcast facility in Warsaw, Poland.

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contact info:  
www.innovision-optics.com
sales@innovision-optics.com
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Canon HDgc, eHDxs, and IFpro Lenses

Engineered specially for tapeless HD camcorders, the HDgc (general class) lenses combine optical features such as reduced chromatic aberration and high- and well-controlled MTF with digital operational tools, including Shuttle Shot, Framing Preset and Speed Preset. Comprising the lineup of HDgc lenses for ½-inch CCD cameras are the KH21ex5.7 IRSE (telephoto version), the KH10ex3.6 IRSE (wide-angle lens), and a 16x standard version that will be available later this year. All three lenses feature Canon’s “eDrive” technology, allowing users to program such functions as zoom and focus settings into a lens for precise, automated repeatability via an LCD menu, assignable “soft” function buttons, and the rocker switch built into the lens grip. Also part of the HDgc family, but without eDrive, are the KH20x6.4 KRS lens (for ½-inch HD CCD cameras) and the KJ20x8.5B KRS lens (for 2/3-inch HD CCD cameras).

For HD ENG/EFP capture, Canon has introduced the new, smaller, lightweight HJ18ex28B IASE Super Telephoto HD lens to the eHDxs line. Features of the HJ18ex28B include Canon’s Enhanced Digital eDrive, a built-in focus motor, and the zoom and iris motors traditionally found in portable ENG/EFP lenses.

Making up the IFpro line of professional SD lenses are the YJ20x8.5B series and YJ13x6B series. Both series are available in three configurations, the standard KRS model, the IRS model with a 2X extender and the remote-control KTS model. All of these lenses feature Canon’s Internal Focus technology (IFpro) as well as Canon’s Shuttle Shot function.

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contact info:
Canon lenses or Canobeam products
(800) 321-4388
 
www.usa.canon.com
www.canonbroadcast.com
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Canon XL H1, Canobeam DT-100 and Realis

Additionally, the camera allows the user to switch back to SD resolution if needed thanks to Canon’s proprietary DIGIC DV II image processor, which can process HD and SD video signals as well as still photos while maintaining the correct color space for each mode.

The XL H1 is further complemented by Canon’s optional software, called Console. With Console, users can control key camcorder functions and settings remotely from a Windows PC, enabling crane mounts and shooting in inaccessible or dangerous conditions. Furthermore, footage can be recorded directly to the computer’s hard drive while the user keeps an eye on the image via onscreen vectorscope and waveform monitors.

Additional features of the XL H1 include uncompressed digital HD-SDI output (SMPTE 292M), SMPTE Time Code Input/Output and Genlock synchronization, and an extensive selection of image adjustments.

Other products include the Canobeam DT-100 Series of optical beam communication transceivers and three new Realis multimedia projectors, the SX6 (with Adobe RGB color match), SX60 (featuring a Home Cinema mode), and X600 Multimedia (the first LCOS XGA model). Incorporating Canon’s proprietary AISYS (Aspectual Illumination System), which equalizes light from the projector lamp to maximize the imaging power of LCOS technology, the Realis projectors feature high resolution (SXGA+ in all models except the X600), accurate color, intricate “grid-free” detail, text visible to 7 pt., and full-motion HD-quality video (true 16x9 720p). All new Realis models are compatible with HDCP-encrypted content and feature motion-adaptive IP Conversion and 2-3 pulldown for automatic, correct display of input signals, as well as “Auto Set” and “Off and Go” for getting started and packing up fast.

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contact info:
Canon lenses or Canobeam products,
(800) 321-4388
Canon’s XL H1 HDV camcorder and other models,
(800) OK-CANON
 
www.usa.canon.com
www.canonbroadcast.com
www.canondv.com
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syncVUE

Intelligent Gadgets has introduced the syncVUE media synchronizer that plugs into Skype VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) conferencing software. Whether separated by cubicles, city blocks, or continents, syncVUE allows multiple users to simultaneously view and annotate media files — QuickTime and preferred codecs like AVC (H.264) at any resolution supported by the computer — in perfect sync.

Features of syncVUE include master/client mode, which permits one user to be in control of the session, and a “free” mode that accepts input and direction dynamically from anyone; time-code based text annotation, allowing users to see coherent text notes with frame-accurate time-code locators when they are entered from anyone in the session; off-line mode for private reviewing, with the ability to upload off-line notes into an online session; and the ability to import time-code markers and notes directly into popular NLE systems such as Final Cut Pro.
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contact info:
syncVUE
(949) 488-7814

 
www.syncvue.com
info@syncvue.com
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Kino Flo VistaBeam and BarFly

Kino Flo, a leading maker of professional fluorescent lighting systems for feature film, television and commercial production, TV broadcast and digital video, rolled out an array of new products at NAB 2006, including the VistaBeam, the BarFly, the ParaZip, the ParaBeam and the Koloris High-Beam LED.

The VistaBeam 600 and VistaBeam 300 are the newest large-area studio soft lighting fixtures from Kino Flo, with a special design that makes them versatile enough to use on a stand as a key or fill source, or mounted facing downward to lay out a smooth, even blanket of soft light similar to a 6K space light. Unlike a tungsten unit, however, the VistaBeam operates coolly and pulls only 10 amps of power.

Both the VistaBeam 600 (six lamps) and 300 (three lamps) can operate either daylight- or tungsten-balanced lamps (or a mix of both), and both come complete with a DMX control system. Additional features include high output/standard output switching, individual lamp control, instant-on, dead quiet/flicker-free ballast performance, remote operation, reflector, louver, gel frame, center mount/yoke mount option and stackable design.

Available in four-tube, two-tube, and single-tube models, the BarFly is only about an inch thick and sports a metal shell rather than the traditional Kino poly-shell design. A four-tube BarFly 400 measures about 15”x15” but puts out nearly as much light as its larger 4’ four-bank cousin. Additionally, just for the BarFly fixtures, Kino Flo has developed new, high color rendering (CRI 95), high-output quad tubes available in True Match daylight and tungsten styles.

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contact info:
Kino Flo
(818) 767-6528
 
www.kinoflo.com
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Kino Flo ParaZip

Expanding its line of high-end professional studio luminaries, Kino Flo has introduced two new soft lights, the ParaZip 400 and the ParaZip 200 DMX variable control fixtures. Displaying a wide, soft beam of incandescent- or daylight-quality light (CRI 95), the ParaZips can be controlled without dramatic shifts in Kelvin temperature.

Lamps in the ParaZip can be dimmed or switched remotely via a DMX signal or manually at the head, and the shallow fixture profile makes the unit especially suited to smaller studios that have low ceilings. Other features include a mounting yoke, parabolic mirror-finished reflectors, gel frame, louver and 15’ power cord. Available accessories include barndoors and 60- and 90-degree black honeycomb louvers.
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contact info:
Kino Flo
(818) 767-6528
 
www.kinoflo.com
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Kino Flo Koloris

Previously only available for lease, Kino Flo has begun selling its popular line of LED color changing Kino Koloris DMX systems. Koloris lights, with their cool operating temperature, can be handheld and moved in close to other set pieces or live subjects without fear of burning, while the units’ 16.7 million colors provide a wide spectrum of creative possibilities to cinematographers and other lighting professionals. Up to 512 fixtures can be chased or dimmed using a DMX theatrical control board.

Two fixture sizes are available, a 12” Koloris fixture that draws less than 2 amps and a 6” fixture that draws less than 1 amp. The power supply can run four Koloris fixtures at a time, each up to 50’ away, and kits come complete with the power supply, fixtures, extension cables, mounting systems and a ship case.
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contact info:
Kino Flo
(818) 767-6528
 
www.kinoflo.com
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Kino Flo ParaBeam with Select Switching

Improving on the already well-established ParaBeam 400, Kino Flo has introduced a redesigned model with a new “Select” switching feature that enhances the variable light control of the beam of soft light. These new “Select” fixtures can be dimmed remotely via DMX or manually at the fixture, and also two tubes at a time can be switched on or off via the “Select” feature. According to company president Frieder Hochheim, “The new switch allows you to operate down at a full f-stop less light output with ‘no’ shift in color.”

Also available for the ParaBeam is the Power Card ballast system. Customers can replace or upgrade the ParaBeam electronics without using any tools, on location or in the studio. Additionally, the Power Card system is supported by a one-year limited warranty against manufacturer’s defects.
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contact info:
Kino Flo
(818) 767-6528
 
www.kinoflo.com
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Angenieux HD-E Lenses

Thales Angenieux showcased its extensive lineup of HD broadcast and video production lenses at this year’s NAB conference, in addition to introducing a new lens for the Super 35 format.

First on the table was Angenieux’s new HD-E series. Designed in response to the market need for an economical line of HD general purpose broadcast lenses, the HD-E series comprises the 19x7.3 AIF HD-E lens, the wide-angle 10x5.3 AIF HD-E lens, and the wide zoom 26x7.8 AIF HD-E lens. Of the three, the 10x5.3 AIF HD-E is a lightweight, wide angle, 2/3” lens designed for ENG/EFP applications that features a focal length of 5.3 to 53mm, 84-degree horizontal field angle, and a fast f/2 aperture. Meanwhile, the 26 x 7.8 AIF HD-E offers a focal range of 7.8 to 203mm and a fast aperture of f/2.2. Additional features include resistance to condensation, dust, and rain, and a rectangular sunshade that minimizes light interference. All three new HD-E lenses incorporate Thales Angeniuex’s AIF (Assisted Internal Focus) technology, an integrated UV filter, and an ergonomic design with sturdy construction.

Of the three lenses, however, Angenieux maintains the 19 x 7.3 AIF HD-E as the flagship of the series. With a focal range of 7.3mm to 139mm, the lens weighs in at 3.7 lbs and is also available in HD and SD formats with a 2X extender (taking the weight to an even 4 lbs).

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contact info:
Thales Angenieux
(973) 812-3858
 
www.angenieux.com
angenieux@tccus.com
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Thales Angenieux and Vision III

Thales Angenieux has teamed with Vision III Imaging to incorporate Vision III’s new v3 AX2 Parallax Scanning Adapter into the Angenieux 26 x 7.8 AIF HD ENG/EFP Telephoto Zoom. Developed for recording visual parallax information (i.e. differing points of view on a subject) to impart the perception of dimension when presented to the brain in the correct manner, the AX2 Parallax Scanning Adapter allows conventional video production cameras to shoot images with enhanced texture and depth that appear dimensional when viewed on virtually any standard image display, such as a TV, a film or video projector, or a computer monitor. Furthermore, the AX2 Parallax Scanning Adapter is compatible with virtually any conventional camera (video or film) and requires no change to current production techniques.

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contact info:
Thales Angenieux
(973) 812-3858
Vision III Imaging
(703) 478-5270
 
www.angenieux.com
angenieux@tccus.com
www.inv3.com
info@inv3.com
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Angenieux Digital 40x15 AIF HD Lens and Optimo 28-76mm Lens

Thales Angenieux has showed the Digital 40x15 AIF HD lens, a 2/3" (16x9 aspect ratio) lens that touts a focal length of 15-600mm and an f/2.7-f/5.4 lens speed.

Veering briefly from the focus on digital optics, the company also introduced the Optimo 28-76 film lens for the Super 35mm format. With a consistent speed of T2.6 throughout the zoom range and a close focus of 2', the 2.7x zoom lens also promises no breathing and features 320-degree focus rotation with over 25 witness marks. The Optimo 28-76 zoom lens is available with both PL and Panavision mounts.
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contact info:
Thales Angenieux
(973) 812-3858

 
www.angenieux.com
angenieux@tccus.com
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